An uncommon clinical feature of IAN injury after third molar removal: a delayed paresthesia case series and literature review.

Andrea Borgonovo, Albino Bianchi, Andrea Marchetti, Rachele Censi, Carlo Maiorana

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

After an inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury, the onset of altered sensation usually begins immediately after surgery. However, it sometimes begins after several days, which is referred to as delayed paresthesia. The authors considered three different etiologies that likely produce inflammation along the nerve trunk and cause delayed paresthesia: compression of the clot, fibrous reorganization of the clot, and nerve trauma caused by bone fragments during clot organization. The aim of this article was to evaluate the etiology of IAN delayed paresthesia, analyze the literature, present a case series related to three different causes of this pathology, and compare delayed paresthesia with the classic immediate symptomatic paresthesia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)353-359
Number of pages7
JournalQuintessence international (Berlin, Germany : 1985)
Volume43
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - May 2012

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Mandibular Nerve
Third Molar
Paresthesia
Wounds and Injuries
Pathology
Inflammation
Bone and Bones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

An uncommon clinical feature of IAN injury after third molar removal : a delayed paresthesia case series and literature review. / Borgonovo, Andrea; Bianchi, Albino; Marchetti, Andrea; Censi, Rachele; Maiorana, Carlo.

In: Quintessence international (Berlin, Germany : 1985), Vol. 43, No. 5, 05.2012, p. 353-359.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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