Analgesic effect of topical diclofenac versus betamethasone after posterior segment surgery

G. Lesnoni, A. M. Coppe, G. Manni, B. Billi, M. Stirpe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In clinical use, topical diclofenac, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory, was found to be remarkably effective as an analgesic. A trial was therefore conducted to quantify and compare this effect with that of other drugs commonly used after posterior segment surgery. Methods: A single-blind, randomized study of 37 patients undergoing posterior segment surgery was conducted. On the day of surgery and for 30 days thereafter, one group received topical diclofenac 0.1% and one group received topical betamethasone 0.1%. Pain intensity was assessed by two standard psychologic tests, the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) and Scott’s Visual Analogic Scale (VAS). Results: The group receiving diclofenac had significantly lower pain scores on the MPQ at days 1 and 15 (P <0.05 and P <0.03, respectively). The VAS scores were also statistically lower for this group on day 15 (P <0.03). Conclusion: Topical diclofenac 0.1% has greater analgesic action than topical betamethasone 0.1% without the side effects of steroids, and may be useful after posterior segment surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34-36
Number of pages3
JournalRetina
Volume15
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Betamethasone
Diclofenac
Analgesics
Pain Measurement
Single-Blind Method
Pain
Psychological Tests
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Steroids
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Analgesic effect
  • Betamethasone
  • Diclofenac
  • McGill pain questionnaire
  • Posterior segment surgery
  • Visual analogic scale

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Lesnoni, G., Coppe, A. M., Manni, G., Billi, B., & Stirpe, M. (1995). Analgesic effect of topical diclofenac versus betamethasone after posterior segment surgery. Retina, 15(1), 34-36.

Analgesic effect of topical diclofenac versus betamethasone after posterior segment surgery. / Lesnoni, G.; Coppe, A. M.; Manni, G.; Billi, B.; Stirpe, M.

In: Retina, Vol. 15, No. 1, 1995, p. 34-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lesnoni, G, Coppe, AM, Manni, G, Billi, B & Stirpe, M 1995, 'Analgesic effect of topical diclofenac versus betamethasone after posterior segment surgery', Retina, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 34-36.
Lesnoni, G. ; Coppe, A. M. ; Manni, G. ; Billi, B. ; Stirpe, M. / Analgesic effect of topical diclofenac versus betamethasone after posterior segment surgery. In: Retina. 1995 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 34-36.
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