Analyse des effets fonctionnels des orthèses dynamiques et statiques après lésion du nerf radial

Translated title of the contribution: Analyzing the functional effects of dynamic and static splints after radial nerve injury

R. Cantero-Téllez, J. H. Villafañe, S. G. Garcia-Orza, K. Valdes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The radial nerve is a commonly injured upper extremity peripheral nerve. The inability to extend the wrist results in a loss of hand function and dexterity that affects patients’ ability to perform their activities of daily living. There is no strong evidence to support a particular splint design for improving dexterity. This cohort study compared whether a static or dynamic splint can improve hand dexterity when assessed with the 9-hole peg test (9-HPT) after radial nerve injury. Thirty-four subjects with radial nerve palsy participated in the study. The test was repeated three times for each subject, first without the splint, and then while wearing the control static wrist splint, and finally while wearing the dynamic splint. The 9-HPT was used as the outcome measure. The 9-HPT times were 36.4 ± 4.8 seconds without a wrist splint and improved when using the static and the dynamic splints to 33.5 ± 4.5 seconds (P < 0.01) and 25.7 ± 3.5 seconds (P < 0.01) respectively. The use of a dynamic splint after radial nerve palsy can provide the patient with greater manual dexterity when compared to using no splint or a static splint.

Translated title of the contributionAnalyzing the functional effects of dynamic and static splints after radial nerve injury
Original languageFrench
JournalHand Surgery and Rehabilitation
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Dynamic splints
  • Hand injuries
  • Occupational therapy
  • Radial neuropathy
  • Upper extremity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Rehabilitation

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