Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin ii receptor blockers and diabetes: A meta-analysis of placebo-controlled clinical trials

Giuliano Tocci, Francesco Paneni, Francesca Palano, Sebastiano Sciarretta, Andrea Ferrucci, Theodore Kurtz, Giuseppe Mancia, Massimo Volpe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BackgroundTo determine whether the administration of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) on top of standard cardiovascular (CV) therapies may reduce the incidence of new onset diabetes (NOD) in placebo-controlled clinical trials. The effects of these drugs on CV and non-CV mortality were also tested.MethodsWe performed a meta-analysis of all randomized clinical trials (11 trials, n = 84,363 patients, aged 64.2± 5.86 years), published until 14 March 2010, in which ACE inhibitors or ARBs were compared with placebo and NOD incidence, CV, and non-CV mortality were reported.ResultsOver an average follow-up of 4.0 ±1.0 years, there were 1,284/15,142 (8.5%) cases of NOD in active-treated and 1,411/15,130 (9.3%) cases in placebo-treated patients in the ACE inhibitor trials, and 2,330/18,756 (12.4%) cases in active-treated and 2,669/18,800 (14.2%) cases in placebo-treated patients in the ARB trials. Overall, active therapy reduced NOD compared to placebo (odds ratio (OR) 95%, confidence interval (CI): 0.8 (0.8-0.9); P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)582-590
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Hypertension
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2011

Keywords

  • angiotensin II receptor blockers
  • angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors
  • blood pressure
  • cardiovascular mortality
  • hypertension
  • meta-analysis
  • new onset diabetes mellitus
  • non-cardiovascular mortality
  • randomized clinical trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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