Anti-SCID mouse reactivity shapes the human CD4+ T cell repertoire in hu-PBL-SCID chimeras

Magdalena Tary-Lehmann, Paul V. Lehmann, Dominique Schols, Maria Grazia Roncarolo, Andrew Saxon

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Abstract

Injecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cells into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice results in long-term engraftment of human lymphocytes, of which >98% are phenotypically mature, activated T cells. Here we have characterized the human T cells that populate such hu-PBL-SCID chimeras. We report that these human T cells do not mobilize Ca2+ after CD3 stimulation, i.e., their T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signal transduction is deficient. Chimera-derived human T cells do not secrete lymphokines or undergo blastogenesis after CD3 stimulation, but proliferate in response to interleukin 2 (IL-2), defining the chimera derived human T cells as anergic. Anergy was seen in both the CD4+ and the CD8+ subpopulations. We established human T cells lines from chimeras. These T cells retained their anergic state for 1-2 mo in culture, after which they simultaneously regained the ability to mobilize Ca2+, secrete lymphokines, and to undergo blastogenesis following stimulation via the TCR. Once regaining proliferative responsiveness to CD3 stimulation, these CD4+ T cell lines displayed anti-SCID mouse reactivity and showed no specificity for recall antigens. All CD3-responsive CD4+ T cell clones obtained from such lines were SCID mouse specific, recognizing native major histocompatibility complex class II products on the murine cells. In contrast, chimera-derived human CD8+ cell lines and clones did not display detectable anti-mouse reactivity. The data show that the human T cell system in long term hu-PBL-SCID chimeras is nonfunctional due to both anergy and the limitation of the CD4+ repertoire to xenoreactive clones. The data suggest that long-term hu-PBL-SCID chimerism represents an atypical graft-versus-host reaction in which the human effector T cells become anergic in the murine environment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1817-1827
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Experimental Medicine
Volume180
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 1994

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SCID Mice
T-Lymphocytes
Clone Cells
Lymphokines
Lymphocyte Activation
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Cell Line
Chimerism
Major Histocompatibility Complex
Interleukin-2
Signal Transduction
Blood Cells
Lymphocytes
Transplants
Antigens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Tary-Lehmann, M., Lehmann, P. V., Schols, D., Roncarolo, M. G., & Saxon, A. (1994). Anti-SCID mouse reactivity shapes the human CD4+ T cell repertoire in hu-PBL-SCID chimeras. Journal of Experimental Medicine, 180(5), 1817-1827.

Anti-SCID mouse reactivity shapes the human CD4+ T cell repertoire in hu-PBL-SCID chimeras. / Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Lehmann, Paul V.; Schols, Dominique; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Saxon, Andrew.

In: Journal of Experimental Medicine, Vol. 180, No. 5, 01.11.1994, p. 1817-1827.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tary-Lehmann, M, Lehmann, PV, Schols, D, Roncarolo, MG & Saxon, A 1994, 'Anti-SCID mouse reactivity shapes the human CD4+ T cell repertoire in hu-PBL-SCID chimeras', Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol. 180, no. 5, pp. 1817-1827.
Tary-Lehmann M, Lehmann PV, Schols D, Roncarolo MG, Saxon A. Anti-SCID mouse reactivity shapes the human CD4+ T cell repertoire in hu-PBL-SCID chimeras. Journal of Experimental Medicine. 1994 Nov 1;180(5):1817-1827.
Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena ; Lehmann, Paul V. ; Schols, Dominique ; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia ; Saxon, Andrew. / Anti-SCID mouse reactivity shapes the human CD4+ T cell repertoire in hu-PBL-SCID chimeras. In: Journal of Experimental Medicine. 1994 ; Vol. 180, No. 5. pp. 1817-1827.
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