Anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus immune responses: The role played by Vγ9Vδ2 T cells

Fabrizio Poccia, Chiara Agrati, Concetta Castilletti, Licia Bordi, Cristiana Gioia, Douglas Horejsh, Giuseppe Ippolito, Paul K S Chan, David S C Hui, Joseph J Y Sung, Maria Rosaria Capobianchi, Miroslav Malkovsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is caused by a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV) strain. Analyses of T cell repertoires in health care workers who survived SARS-CoV infection during the 2003 outbreak revealed that their effector memory Vγ9Vδ2 T cell populations were selectively expanded ∼3 months after the onset of disease. No such expansion of their αβ T cell pools was detected. The expansion of the Vγ9Vδ2 T cell population was associated with higher anti-SARS-CoV immunoglobulin G titers. In addition, in vitro experiments demonstrated that stimulated Vγ9Vδ2 cells display an interferon-γ-dependent anti-SARS-CoV activity and are able to directly kill SARS-CoV-infected target cells. These findings are compatible with the possibility that Vγ9Vδ2 T cells play a protective role during SARS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1244-1249
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume193
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

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