Antibodies mediating cellular cytotoxicity and neutralization correlate with a better clinical stage in children born to human immunodeficiency virus-infected mothers

Kristina Ljunggren, Viviana Moschese, Per Anders Broliden, Carlo Giaquinto, Isabella Quinti, Eva Maria Fenyö, Britta Wahren, Paolo Rossi, Mikael Jondal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In children born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected mothers, factors that determine disease outcome and progression are unclear. Also, early diagnosis is hampered by maternally transferred antibodies. Children aged 0-24 months were retrospectively divided into two groups based on HIV seroreactivity or nonreactivity at age 15 months and analyzed for the presence of antibodies that mediate cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and virus neutralization. No difference was seen in the presence of these functional antibodies between groups. The persistently seropositive group was further divided into non-AIDS and AIDS groups according to clinical status at serum collection. The ADCC antibody frequencies were much higher (70%) in the non-AIDS group than in the AIDS group (30%). Of the non-AIDS children, 63% had neutralizing antibodies; no children with AIDS had these antibodies. HIV-specific ADCC and neutralizing antibodies do not seem to protect against transmission of HIV from mother to child but are significantly correlated with a better clinical stage of childhood HIV infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)198-202
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume161
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

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