Anticoagulation proteins C and S.

C. T. Esmon, S. Vigano-D'Angelo, A. D'Angelo, P. C. Comp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Proteins C and S are two vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins that work in concert as a natural anticoagulant system. Activated protein C is the proteolytic component of the complex and protein S serves as an activated protein C binding protein that is essential for assembly of the anticoagulant complex on cell surfaces. The anticoagulant activity is expressed through the selective inactivation of Factors Va and VIIIa. Many patients deficient in proteins C and S have been described and have an associated thrombotic tendency, but not all heterozygous protein C and S deficient individuals experience thrombotic complications. Multiple mechanisms and/or drugs can lead to acquired deficiencies of these proteins: oral anticoagulation, liver disease, DIC and in the case of protein S, lupus erythematosus, nephrotic syndrome, pregnancy and certain hormones. The anticoagulant activity of protein C decreases rapidly after administration of warfarin (i.e., with a time course similar to Factor VII). This rapid decrease may lead to a transient imbalance and contribute to coumarin induced skin necrosis. Protein S antigen levels do not decrease as rapidly, but protein S functional levels are often low in patients with an acute thrombus. The discrepancy between antigen and function results from elevations in C4b-binding protein, which complexes reversibly with protein S. Unlike free protein S, the complex does not function in the anticoagulant pathway. The available information all suggest that deficiency of protein C and protein S should be considered a risk factor contributing to recurrent thrombotic disease and that the function of these proteins is altered by many common clinical conditions which have associated an increased risk of thrombosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-54
Number of pages8
JournalAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume214
Publication statusPublished - 1987

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Protein S
Protein C
Anticoagulants
Thrombosis
Complement C4b-Binding Protein
Factor VIIIa
Factor Va
Protein C Deficiency
Antigens
Protein Deficiency
Dacarbazine
Factor VII
Vitamin K
Nephrotic Syndrome
Warfarin
Protein Binding
Liver
Liver Diseases
Blood Proteins
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Esmon, C. T., Vigano-D'Angelo, S., D'Angelo, A., & Comp, P. C. (1987). Anticoagulation proteins C and S. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 214, 47-54.

Anticoagulation proteins C and S. / Esmon, C. T.; Vigano-D'Angelo, S.; D'Angelo, A.; Comp, P. C.

In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, Vol. 214, 1987, p. 47-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Esmon, CT, Vigano-D'Angelo, S, D'Angelo, A & Comp, PC 1987, 'Anticoagulation proteins C and S.', Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 214, pp. 47-54.
Esmon, C. T. ; Vigano-D'Angelo, S. ; D'Angelo, A. ; Comp, P. C. / Anticoagulation proteins C and S. In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. 1987 ; Vol. 214. pp. 47-54.
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