Antiepileptic drugs and quality of life in the elderly: Results from a randomized double-blind trial of carbamazepine and lamotrigine in patients with onset of epilepsy in old age

Erik Saetre, Michael Abdelnoor, Emilio Perucca, Erik Taubøll, Jouko Isojärvi, Leif Gjerstad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

During an international double-blind trial evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of lamotrigine and carbamazepine in patients aged ≥65 with newly diagnosed epilepsy, the comparative effects of the drugs on health-related quality of life were investigated based on screening and 12-, 28-, and 40-week data, using the modified Side Effect and Life Satisfaction (SEALS) Inventory and the Liverpool Adverse Event Profile. Of 167 patients, 29 discontinued before first follow-up, and data were incomplete for 13. In 125 eligible subjects (62 taking carbamazepine, 63 taking lamotrigine), comparable baseline data did not change significantly during medication, within or across treatments. A borderline difference in the SEALS Dysphoria subscores favored lamotrigine. No difference between completers and noncompleters was identified. Twelve-week data for noncompleters were comparable across treatments. Changes in the inventories up to 40 weeks correlated moderately. Neither lamotrigine nor carbamazepine seems likely to cause significant changes in health-related quality of life measures after 40 weeks at therapeutic doses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)395-401
Number of pages7
JournalEpilepsy and Behavior
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

Keywords

  • Antiepileptic drugs
  • Carbamazepine
  • Elderly
  • Epilepsy
  • Lamotrigine
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Neurology

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