Antiproteinuric therapy while preventing the abnormal protein traffic in proximal tubule abrogates protein- and complement-dependent interstitial inflammation in experimental renal disease

Mauro Abbate, Carla Zoja, Daniela Rottoli, Daniela Corna, Norberto Perico, Tullio Bertani, Giuseppe Remuzzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In proteinuric glomerulopathies, the excess traffic of proteins into the renal tubule is a candidate trigger of interstitial inflammatory and immune events leading to progressive injury, and a key target for the renoprotective action of antiproteinuric drugs. Among proteins trafficked to the proximal tubule, the third component of complement (C3) can be activated locally and contribute to inflammation at sites of protein reabsorption. Experiments were performed in rats with renal mass reduction (RMR, 5/6 nephrectomy) with the following aims: (1) to study Ig (IgG) and complement deposition in proximal tubules, and interstitial macrophage infiltration and MHC class II expression at intervals after surgery by double immunofluorescence analysis; (2) to assess whether lisinopril (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor [ACEi], 25 mg/L in the drinking water, from either day 1 or day 7) limited IgG and C3 accumulation and interstitial inflammation at day 30. In 7-d remnant kidneys, intracellular staining for both IgG and C3 was detectable in proximal tubules in focal areas; C3 was restricted to IgG-positive tubular cells, and there were no interstitial ED-1 macrophage and MHC II-positive cellular infiltrates. In 14-d and 30-d remnant kidneys, proximal tubular IgG and C3 staining was associated with the appearance of interstitial infiltrates that preferentially localized to areas of tubules positive for both proteins. RMR rats given ACEi had no or limited increases in levels of urinary protein excretion, tubular IgG, and C3 reactivity, and interstitial cellular infiltrates in kidneys at 30 d, even when ACEi was started from day 7 after surgery. These findings document that (1) in RMR, IgG and C3 accumulation in proximal tubular cells is followed by leukocyte infiltration and MHC II overexpression in the adjacent interstitium; (2) ACEi while preventing proteinuria limits both tubular accumulation of IgG and C3 and interstitial inflammation. The data suggest that ACE inhibition can be renoprotective by limiting the early abnormal protein traffic in proximal tubule and consequent deleterious effects of excess protein reabsorption, including the accumulation and local activation of complement as well as the induction of chemokines and endothelin genes known to promote interstitial inflammation and fibrosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)804-813
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume10
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

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