Antiretroviral therapy and pregnancy

Effect on cortical bone status of human immunodeficiency virus-infected caucasian women as assessed by quantitative ultrasonography

Stefano Mora, Cecilia Diceglie, Alessandra Viganò, Vania Giacomet, Valeria Manfredini, Sara Stucchi, Valentina Fabiano, Chiara Mameli, Sonia Coletto, Gian V. Zuccotti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Treatment with antiretroviral agents (ARVs) during pregnancy is important to prevent mother-to-child transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but their use has been associated with low bone mineral density in adult patients. Currently, there are no data regarding the bone status of HIV-infected women who received ARV during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate cortical bone status at delivery in a group of HIV-infected women who received ARV during pregnancy and to monitor the changes occurring during the first year postpartum. We studied 33 HIV-infected and 116 HIV-uninfected healthy Caucasian women within 4 days from delivery. Follow-up measurements were performed at 4 and 12 months postpartum in 17 HIV-infected and 55 healthy women. Cortical bone status was evaluated by quantitative ultrasonography at the mid-tibia, and bone measurements were expressed as the speed of sound (SOS). HIV-infected women after delivery had a median SOS of 3,985 (3,567-4,242) m/s, while the median SOS of healthy women was 4,025 (3,643-4,250) m/s. The difference was not significant (t = 0.39, P = 0.69). No significant differences were observed between ARV-exposed and control subjects at 4 and 12 months. Our data suggest that ARV during pregnancy and the first year after delivery does not affect negatively cortical bone status.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)394-398
Number of pages5
JournalCalcified Tissue International
Volume92
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

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Ultrasonography
HIV
Pregnancy
Postpartum Period
Therapeutics
Anti-Retroviral Agents
Bone and Bones
Cortical Bone
Tibia
Bone Density
Mothers

Keywords

  • Antiretroviral therapy
  • Bone mass
  • HIV infection
  • Pregnancy
  • Quantitative ultrasonography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Antiretroviral therapy and pregnancy : Effect on cortical bone status of human immunodeficiency virus-infected caucasian women as assessed by quantitative ultrasonography. / Mora, Stefano; Diceglie, Cecilia; Viganò, Alessandra; Giacomet, Vania; Manfredini, Valeria; Stucchi, Sara; Fabiano, Valentina; Mameli, Chiara; Coletto, Sonia; Zuccotti, Gian V.

In: Calcified Tissue International, Vol. 92, No. 4, 04.2013, p. 394-398.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mora, Stefano ; Diceglie, Cecilia ; Viganò, Alessandra ; Giacomet, Vania ; Manfredini, Valeria ; Stucchi, Sara ; Fabiano, Valentina ; Mameli, Chiara ; Coletto, Sonia ; Zuccotti, Gian V. / Antiretroviral therapy and pregnancy : Effect on cortical bone status of human immunodeficiency virus-infected caucasian women as assessed by quantitative ultrasonography. In: Calcified Tissue International. 2013 ; Vol. 92, No. 4. pp. 394-398.
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