Antisense strategy unravels a dopamine receptor distinct from the D2 subtype, uncoupled with adenylyl cyclase, inhibiting prolactin release from rat pituitary cells

Alessandra Valerio, Antonella Alberici, Cristina Tinti, PierFranco Spano, Maurizio Memo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The antisense strategy was used to unravel the functional contribution of the mRNAs encoding dopamine (DA) receptors to the multiple transduction mechanisms operated by DA in rat pituitary cells. An antisense oligonucleotide was designed to recognize seven nucleotides upstream and 11 nucleotides downstream from the initiation translation codon of the mRNA that encodes the DA D2 receptor. Addition of the antisense oligonucleotide for 7 days to primary culture of rat pituitary cells resulted in a decreased expression of DA D2 receptor as shown by (a) the virtual disappearance of [3H]spiroperidol binding sites and (b) the marked reduction in the levels of both the long and the short splice variant of the D2 receptor mRNAs. After this treatment, the DA D2 receptor agonist bromocriptine lost its capability both to inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity and to reduce prolactin mRNA levels. On the contrary, the inhibition of prolactin release induced by bromocriptine was affected minimally by the antisense oligonucleotide treatment. These data indicate that (a) translation of the mRNA encoding DA D2 receptors results in receptors that are negatively coupled with adenylyl cyclase and functionally linked to inhibition of prolactin synthesis; and (b) the release of prolactin might be regulated, at least in part, by a DA receptor that is encoded by mRNA species distinct from those encoding the D2 receptor.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1260-1266
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neurochemistry
Volume62
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1994

Keywords

  • Adenylyl cyclase
  • Antisense oligonucleotides
  • Dopamine receptors
  • Pituitary gland
  • Prolactin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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