Antitumor effects of the benzophenanthridine alkaloid sanguinarine in a rat syngeneic model of colorectal cancer

Francesca Pica, Emanuela Balestrieri, Annalucia Serafino, Roberta Sorrentino, Roberta Gaziano, Gabriella Moroni, Noemi Moroni, Graziana Palmieri, Maurizio Mattei, Enrico Garaci, Paola Sinibaldi-Vallebona

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To evaluate the in-vivo preclinical antitumor activity of sanguinarine in a rat syngeneic model of colorectal cancer. The effects of sanguinarine on DHD/K12/TRb colorectal adenocarcinoma cells were first evaluated in vitro by means of 3H-thymidine incorporation, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5- (3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium) (MTS) assay, and terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) microscopy. For the in-vivo studies, DHD/K12/TRb cells (1.5×10 6 cells/0.3 ml of sterile saline/animal) were injected subcutaneously in syngeneic BDIX rats, which were chronically treated with sanguinarine (5 mg/kg/day per os) or control diluent. Tumor growth, body weight, hematologic, and clinical chemistry measurements were monitored in individual animals at defined time intervals. After killing, subcutaneous tumors were explanted from experimental animals for histopathological examination. In vitro, micromolar concentrations of sanguinarine inhibited dose-dependently DHD/K12/TRb cell proliferation and metabolism and induced cell death by apoptosis. In vivo, oral administration of sanguinarine induced a significant inhibition of tumor growth (P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)32-42
Number of pages11
JournalAnti-Cancer Drugs
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2012

Keywords

  • DHD/K12/TRb colorectal cancer
  • experimental animal models
  • sanguinarine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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