Applying proteomic technology to clinical virology

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Developing antiviral drugs, vaccines and diagnostic markers is still the most ambitious challenge in clinical virology. In the past few decades, data from high-throughput technologies have allowed for the rapid development of new antiviral therapeutic strategies, thus making a profound impact on translational research. Most of the current preclinical studies in virology are aimed at evaluating the dynamic composition and localization of the protein platforms involved in various host-virus interactions. Among the different possible approaches, mass spectrometry-based proteomics is increasingly being used to define the protein composition in subcellular compartments, quantify differential protein expression among samples, characterize protein complexes, and analyse protein post-translational modifications. Here, we review the current knowledge of the most useful proteomic approaches in the study of viral persistence and pathogenicity, with a particular focus on recent advances in hepatitis C research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-28
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Microbiology and Infection
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Virology
Proteomics
Technology
Antiviral Agents
Proteins
Marker Vaccines
Translational Medical Research
Post Translational Protein Processing
Hepatitis C
Virulence
Mass Spectrometry
Viruses
Research
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Biomarker discovery
  • HCV
  • Mass spectrometry
  • Post-translational modifications
  • Proteomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Applying proteomic technology to clinical virology. / Mancone, C.; Ciccosanti, F.; Montaldo, C.; Perdomo, A. B.; Piacentini, M.; Alonzi, T.; Fimia, G. M.; Tripodi, M.

In: Clinical Microbiology and Infection, Vol. 19, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 23-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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