APS and the nervous system

Cecilia Beatrice Chighizola, Davide Sangalli, Barbara Corrà, Vincenzo Silani, Laura Adobbati

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Cerebrovascular disease is the most frequent clinical manifestation of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) at disease onset, after deep venous thrombosis. At a 10-year follow-up, it represents the overall most common clinical event related to antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Besides thrombotic events affecting brain circulation, a wide range of “non-criteria” neurological manifestations has been associated with aPL such as dementia, epilepsy, chorea, headache, multiple sclerosis, myelopathy, peripheral neuropathy, hearing loss, and ocular syndromes. aPL display a particular tropism for cerebral circulation, which might be partially explained by the peculiarity of brain endothelial cells. However, aPL might induce neurological manifestations not only because of pro-thrombotic mechanisms but also because they can bind to neurons and astrocytes, disrupting their function. Ischemic manifestations of APS always require the initiation of either antiplatelet drugs or long-term anticoagulants; no standard treatment is available for nonvascular neurological manifestations of APS. The wide heterogeneity in neurological presentation of APS represents a challenge for clinicians: it is important to promptly recognize and effectively treat them in early stages, in order to avoid diagnostic and therapeutic delay.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAntiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: From Bench to Bedside
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages89-102
Number of pages14
ISBN (Print)9783319110448, 9783319110431
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015

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Antiphospholipid Antibodies
Antiphospholipid Syndrome
Nervous System
Neurologic Manifestations
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Chorea
Tropism
Spinal Cord Diseases
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors
Brain
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Hearing Loss
Venous Thrombosis
Astrocytes
Anticoagulants
Multiple Sclerosis
Headache
Dementia
Epilepsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Chighizola, C. B., Sangalli, D., Corrà, B., Silani, V., & Adobbati, L. (2015). APS and the nervous system. In Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: From Bench to Bedside (pp. 89-102). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-11044-8_8

APS and the nervous system. / Chighizola, Cecilia Beatrice; Sangalli, Davide; Corrà, Barbara; Silani, Vincenzo; Adobbati, Laura.

Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: From Bench to Bedside. Springer International Publishing, 2015. p. 89-102.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Chighizola, CB, Sangalli, D, Corrà, B, Silani, V & Adobbati, L 2015, APS and the nervous system. in Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: From Bench to Bedside. Springer International Publishing, pp. 89-102. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-11044-8_8
Chighizola CB, Sangalli D, Corrà B, Silani V, Adobbati L. APS and the nervous system. In Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: From Bench to Bedside. Springer International Publishing. 2015. p. 89-102 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-11044-8_8
Chighizola, Cecilia Beatrice ; Sangalli, Davide ; Corrà, Barbara ; Silani, Vincenzo ; Adobbati, Laura. / APS and the nervous system. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: From Bench to Bedside. Springer International Publishing, 2015. pp. 89-102
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