Are natural killer cells involved in multiple sclerosis etiology? Evidences from NKp46/NCR1 receptor modulation in an observational study

Maria Galuppo, Sabrina Giacoppo, Edoardo Sessa, Placido Bramanti, Emanuela Mazzon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Natural killer (NK) cells are implicated in many autoimmune diseases but their role in multiple sclerosis (MS) remains still unknown. This study was aimed to evaluate the expression levels of a NK cell receptor (NCR1) in patients with diagnosis of MS. Particularly, the study took into account patients undergoing pharmacological therapy with interferon-beta or natalizumab and patients never treated since first-time diagnosed for MS. Expression levels of NCR1 receptor were evaluated in protein extracts of peripheral blood mononuclear cells performing western blot analysis. Our results show that MS patients display higher NCR1 expression levels than healthy controls. Moreover, patients with a first diagnosis ofMS display the highest level of NCR1 when compared with patients pharmacologically treated with interferon-beta or natalizumab. Therefore, pharmacologically treated MS patients show a modulated NK cell expression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)248-251
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume345
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 15 2014

Fingerprint

Natural Cytotoxicity Triggering Receptor 1
Natural Killer Cells
Multiple Sclerosis
Observational Studies
Interferon-beta
Natural Killer Cell Receptors
Autoimmune Diseases
Blood Cells
Western Blotting
Pharmacology

Keywords

  • Interferon-beta
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Natalizumab
  • Natural killer cells
  • NKp46/NCR1 receptor
  • Peripheral blood mononuclear cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Natural killer (NK) cells are implicated in many autoimmune diseases but their role in multiple sclerosis (MS) remains still unknown. This study was aimed to evaluate the expression levels of a NK cell receptor (NCR1) in patients with diagnosis of MS. Particularly, the study took into account patients undergoing pharmacological therapy with interferon-beta or natalizumab and patients never treated since first-time diagnosed for MS. Expression levels of NCR1 receptor were evaluated in protein extracts of peripheral blood mononuclear cells performing western blot analysis. Our results show that MS patients display higher NCR1 expression levels than healthy controls. Moreover, patients with a first diagnosis ofMS display the highest level of NCR1 when compared with patients pharmacologically treated with interferon-beta or natalizumab. Therefore, pharmacologically treated MS patients show a modulated NK cell expression.",
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AU - Galuppo, Maria

AU - Giacoppo, Sabrina

AU - Sessa, Edoardo

AU - Bramanti, Placido

AU - Mazzon, Emanuela

PY - 2014/10/15

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N2 - Natural killer (NK) cells are implicated in many autoimmune diseases but their role in multiple sclerosis (MS) remains still unknown. This study was aimed to evaluate the expression levels of a NK cell receptor (NCR1) in patients with diagnosis of MS. Particularly, the study took into account patients undergoing pharmacological therapy with interferon-beta or natalizumab and patients never treated since first-time diagnosed for MS. Expression levels of NCR1 receptor were evaluated in protein extracts of peripheral blood mononuclear cells performing western blot analysis. Our results show that MS patients display higher NCR1 expression levels than healthy controls. Moreover, patients with a first diagnosis ofMS display the highest level of NCR1 when compared with patients pharmacologically treated with interferon-beta or natalizumab. Therefore, pharmacologically treated MS patients show a modulated NK cell expression.

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