Are raw scores on memory tests better than age- and education- adjusted scores for predicting progression from amnesic mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer disease?

Davide Quaranta, Guido Gainotti, Maria Gabriella Vita, Giordano Lacidogna, Eugenia Scaricamazza, Chiara Piccininni, Camillo Marra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this prospective longitudinal study, conducted in a large sample of amnestic MCI patients over a three-year period, we investigated the recently advanced proposal that unadjusted test scores obtained at baseline on long-term memory tests are more reliable than age-and education-corrected scores in predicting progression from aMCI to AD. Our experimental sample consisted of 270 aMCI patients who underwent extensive neurological and neuropsychological examinations both at baseline and at the follow-up, conducted at least 3 years later. At the follow-up 80 patients had converted to overt dementia. The predictive capacity of raw, age-corrected, education-corrected and fully corrected scores on RAVLT immediate and delayed recall was compared by examining the area under the ROC curves (AUCs) of all of these scores to assess which (raw or corrected) scores achieves the better reliability in predicting conversion to dementia. The condition (aMCI stable vs converted) was analyzed to assess the odds ratios resulting from a logistic regression on the corrected and uncorrected scores of RAVLT immediate and delayed recall. Even if both in immediate and in delayed re-call the ROCs of ‘raw scores’ were generally higher than the other ROCs on corrected scores, these differences did not reach the level of statistical significance, failing to support the claim that unadjusted test scores are superior to age-and education-corrected scores in predicting progression from aMCI to AD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1414-1420
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Alzheimer Research
Volume13
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2016

Fingerprint

Alzheimer Disease
Short-Term Memory
Education
Dementia
Long-Term Memory
Neurologic Examination
ROC Curve
Area Under Curve
Longitudinal Studies
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • Age and education corrected scores
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • AMCI conversion
  • RAVLT memory test
  • Raw scores
  • Uncorrected immediate and delayed recall

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Are raw scores on memory tests better than age- and education- adjusted scores for predicting progression from amnesic mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer disease? / Quaranta, Davide; Gainotti, Guido; Vita, Maria Gabriella; Lacidogna, Giordano; Scaricamazza, Eugenia; Piccininni, Chiara; Marra, Camillo.

In: Current Alzheimer Research, Vol. 13, No. 12, 01.12.2016, p. 1414-1420.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Quaranta, Davide ; Gainotti, Guido ; Vita, Maria Gabriella ; Lacidogna, Giordano ; Scaricamazza, Eugenia ; Piccininni, Chiara ; Marra, Camillo. / Are raw scores on memory tests better than age- and education- adjusted scores for predicting progression from amnesic mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer disease?. In: Current Alzheimer Research. 2016 ; Vol. 13, No. 12. pp. 1414-1420.
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