Are there specific treatments for the metabolic syndrome?

Dario Giugliano, Antonio Ceriello, Katherine Esposito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The concept of the metabolic syndrome, although controversial, continues to gain acceptance. Whereas each risk factor of the metabolic syndrome (visceral obesity, atherogenetic dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and dysglycemia) can be dealt with individually, the recommended initial therapeutic approach is to focus on reversing its root causes of atherogenetic diet, sedentary lifestyle, and overweight or obesity. No single diet is currently recommended for patients with the metabolic syndrome, although epidemiologic evidence suggests a lower prevalence of the metabolic syndrome associated with dietary patterns rich in fruit, vegetables, whole grains, dairy products, and unsaturated fats. We conducted a literature search to identify clinical trials specifically dealing with the resolution of the metabolic syndrome by lifestyle, drugs, or obesity surgery. Criteria used for study selection were English language, randomized trials with a placebo or control group (except for surgery), a follow-up lasting ≥6 mo, and a time frame of 5 y. We identified 3 studies based on lifestyle interventions, 5 studies based on drug therapy, and 3 studies based on laparoscopic weight-reduction surgery The striking resolution of the metabolic syndrome with weight-reduction surgery (93%) as compared with lifestyle (25%) and drugs (19%) strongly suggests that obesity is the driving force for the occurrence of this condition. Although there is no "all-inclusive" diet yet, it seems plausible that a Mediterranean-style diet has most of the desired attributes, including a lower content of refined carbohydrates, a high content of fiber, a moderate content of fat (mostly unsaturated), and a moderate-to-high content of vegetable proteins.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8-11
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume87
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2008

Fingerprint

metabolic syndrome
obesity
surgery
Unsaturated Fats
lifestyle
Life Style
Obesity
Diet
diet
Weight Loss
weight loss
Therapeutics
Vegetable Proteins
Mediterranean Diet
Sedentary Lifestyle
drugs
vegetable protein
Dairy Products
Abdominal Obesity
whole grain foods

Keywords

  • Clinical trials
  • Literature search
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Are there specific treatments for the metabolic syndrome? / Giugliano, Dario; Ceriello, Antonio; Esposito, Katherine.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 87, No. 1, 01.01.2008, p. 8-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Giugliano, Dario ; Ceriello, Antonio ; Esposito, Katherine. / Are there specific treatments for the metabolic syndrome?. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2008 ; Vol. 87, No. 1. pp. 8-11.
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