Aripiprazole: Initial clinical experience with 142 hospitalized psychiatric patients

Franca Centorrino, Kate V. Fogarty, Paola Cimbolli, Paola Salvatore, Terri Ann Thompson, Gabriele Sani, Stephanie L. Cincotta, Ross J. Baldessarini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Aripiprazole is the first dopamine D2 receptor partial-agonist approved for treatment of schizophrenia. Its apparently benign adverse-effect profile encourages broader use in other disorders, especially to limit weight gain associated with other antipsychotic or antimanic agents. We considered the first 6 months of experience with aripiprazole in psychiatric inpatients with a range of disorders. Methods: We analyzed data obtained from medical records of patients treated with aripiprazole who were hospitalized at McLean Hospital (for 19 ±18 days) between December 2002 and June 2003 to evaluate dosing, tolerability, and clinical effects of this new agent in patients diagnosed with DSM-IV psychotic, major affective, or other disorders. Results: Out of a sample of 2766 adult inpatients (65.5% women), 142 were given aripiprazole (mean final daily dose, 16.1 ± 6.2 mg, 0.20 ± 0.09 mg/kg body weight) for major affective disorders (52%), primary psychotic disorders (40%), and dementia (8%). CGI ratings improved by 20% on average. Adverse effects were infrequent (15.5%), were three times more likely among women, and most often involved moderate behavioral activation or nausea, with no new episodes of mania. Of the patients who were given aripiprazole, 83% continued it at discharge. Many patients were obese when they were admitted, and obesity was associated with relatively low mg/kg doses of aripiprazole. Conclusions: Aripiprazole was used in a range of disorders and was generally well tolerated. Adverse effects may reflect its unique dopamine partial-agonist activity. Since aripiprazole is likely to be considered for obese patients, body weight should be considered in establishing adequate doses. Controlled trials of this antipsychotic agent in disorders other than schizophrenia are needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)241-247
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Psychiatric Practice
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2005

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Psychiatry
Antipsychotic Agents
Inpatients
Schizophrenia
Antimanic Agents
Body Weight
Dopamine D2 Receptors
Aripiprazole
Dopamine Agonists
Proxy
Mood Disorders
Bipolar Disorder
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Psychotic Disorders
Nausea
Weight Gain
Medical Records
Dementia
Obesity

Keywords

  • Aripiprazole
  • Atypical antipsychotic
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Drug dosing
  • Schizophrenia
  • Second-generation antipsychotic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Centorrino, F., Fogarty, K. V., Cimbolli, P., Salvatore, P., Thompson, T. A., Sani, G., ... Baldessarini, R. J. (2005). Aripiprazole: Initial clinical experience with 142 hospitalized psychiatric patients. Journal of Psychiatric Practice, 11(4), 241-247. https://doi.org/10.1097/00131746-200507000-00004

Aripiprazole : Initial clinical experience with 142 hospitalized psychiatric patients. / Centorrino, Franca; Fogarty, Kate V.; Cimbolli, Paola; Salvatore, Paola; Thompson, Terri Ann; Sani, Gabriele; Cincotta, Stephanie L.; Baldessarini, Ross J.

In: Journal of Psychiatric Practice, Vol. 11, No. 4, 07.2005, p. 241-247.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Centorrino, F, Fogarty, KV, Cimbolli, P, Salvatore, P, Thompson, TA, Sani, G, Cincotta, SL & Baldessarini, RJ 2005, 'Aripiprazole: Initial clinical experience with 142 hospitalized psychiatric patients', Journal of Psychiatric Practice, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 241-247. https://doi.org/10.1097/00131746-200507000-00004
Centorrino, Franca ; Fogarty, Kate V. ; Cimbolli, Paola ; Salvatore, Paola ; Thompson, Terri Ann ; Sani, Gabriele ; Cincotta, Stephanie L. ; Baldessarini, Ross J. / Aripiprazole : Initial clinical experience with 142 hospitalized psychiatric patients. In: Journal of Psychiatric Practice. 2005 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 241-247.
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