Aspirin, platelets and prevention of vascular disease

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aspirin inhibits thromboxane and prostaglandin formation in platelets and in vascular cells. It prevents platelet aggregation by irreversible acetylation of cyclo-oxygenase, a key enzyme in arachidonic acid metabolism. On the basis of its antiplatelet effect, aspirin has been assessed during the past two decades in patients with a history of myocardial infarction, stroke, transient ischemic attack or unstable angina. A metanalysis of randomized controlled trials of long-term aspirin treatment for the secondary prevention of vascular disease indicated that aspirin (300-1500 mg daily) significantly reduced fatal and non-fatal vascular events. More recently aspirin (160 mg daily) produced a significant reduction in hospital vascular mortality and in non-fatal events in patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction. The combination of aspirin and streptokinase was significantly better than either drug alone. On the other hand, two primary prevention trials of aspirin in healthy doctors did not show any modification of vascular mortality despite an overall reduction of non-fatal myocardial infarction. Resolution of some problems related to the mechanism of action of aspirin and to selection of trial populations will possibly increase the benefit/risk ratio of aspirin treatment for the prevention of vascular disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)289-296
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Lipid Mediators
Volume1
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 1989

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Vascular Diseases
Aspirin
Blood Platelets
Blood Vessels
Myocardial Infarction
Streptokinase
Thromboxanes
Transient Ischemic Attack
Unstable Angina
Primary Prevention
Acetylation
Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases
Secondary Prevention
Hospital Mortality
Platelet Aggregation
Arachidonic Acid
Prostaglandins
Randomized Controlled Trials
Stroke
Odds Ratio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Aspirin, platelets and prevention of vascular disease. / De Gaetano, G.; Cerletti, C.

In: Journal of Lipid Mediators, Vol. 1, No. 5, 1989, p. 289-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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