Assay and properties of the GIT1/p95-APP1 ARFGAP

Ivan De Curtis, Simona Paris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

GIT1/p95-APP1 is an adaptor protein with an aminoterminal ARFGAP domain involved in the regulation of ARF6 function. GIT1/p95-APP1 forms stable complexes with a number of proteins including downstream effectors and exchanging factors for members of the Rho family of small GTPases. This protein can also interact with other adaptor proteins implicated in the regulation of cell adhesion and synapse formation. The stability of the endogenous and reconstituted complexes after cell lysis allows the biochemical identification and characterization of the GIT1 complexes that can be isolated from different cell types. This article presents methods for the identification of the endogenous and reconstituted GIT1 complexes that can be utilized for the biochemical and functional characterization of the complexes from different tissue and cell types.

Original languageEnglish
Article number25
Pages (from-to)267-278
Number of pages12
JournalMethods in Enzymology
Volume404
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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Assays
Rho Factor
Proteins
Monomeric GTP-Binding Proteins
Cell adhesion
Cell Adhesion
Synapses
Tissue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Assay and properties of the GIT1/p95-APP1 ARFGAP. / De Curtis, Ivan; Paris, Simona.

In: Methods in Enzymology, Vol. 404, 25, 2006, p. 267-278.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Curtis, Ivan ; Paris, Simona. / Assay and properties of the GIT1/p95-APP1 ARFGAP. In: Methods in Enzymology. 2006 ; Vol. 404. pp. 267-278.
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