Assessing balance in non-disabled subjects with multiple sclerosis: Validation of the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale

Fabiola Giovanna Mestanza Mattos, Elisa Gervasoni, Denise Anastasi, Rachele Di Giovanni, Andrea Tacchino, Giampaolo Brichetto, Ilaria Carpinella, Paolo Confalonieri, Marco Vercellino, Claudio Solaro, Marco Rovaris, Davide Cattaneo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To validate the Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB) scale for high-functioning non-disabled people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Design: Cross-sectional study. Participants: A convenience sample of early-diagnosed PwMS (N = 82; Expanded Disability Status Scale score ≤ 2.5) with disease duration ≤ 5 years and a control group of healthy volunteers (N = 45). Main Outcome Measures: FAB scale, Timed Up and Go test (TUG), 6 Min Walk Test (6MWT) and 25 Foot Walk Test (25FWT). Results: Six of the ten original FAB scale items were selected to represent a unidimensional construct. Only one factor with eigenvalues > 1.0 (1.90) was found. The new version of the scale reported a Cronbach alpha value of 0.65, and it was also statistically significantly correlated with TUG (r = -0.48). The new six-item scale, dubbed the FAB-short scale (FAB-s), discriminated between healthy volunteers and PwMS; moreover, both the FAB-s and the TUG test discriminated between the two PwMS subgroups: EDSS=0–1.5 (no disability) and EDSS=2–2.5 (minimal disability). Conclusions: FAB-s is a unidimensional clinical tool for assessing balance. The scale is a promising instrument for detecting subtle changes in balance performance in high-functioning PwMS.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102085
JournalMultiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders
Volume42
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2020

Keywords

  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Outcome Assessment
  • Rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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