Assessing demoralization and depression in the setting of medical disease

Lara Mangelli, Giovanni A. Fava, Silvana Grandi, Luigi Grassi, Fedra Ottolini, Piero Porcelli, Chiara Rafanelli, Marco Rigatelli, Nicoletta Sonino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the presence of demoralization and major depression in the setting of medical disease. Method: 807 consecutive outpatients recruited from different medical settings (gastroenterology, cardiology, endocrinology, and oncology) were assessed according to DSM-IV criteria and Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research, using semistructured research interviews. Results: Demoralization was identified in 245 patients (30.4%), while major depression was present in 135 patients (16.7%). Even though there was a considerable overlap between the 2 diagnoses, 59 patients (43.7%) with major depression were not classified as demoralized, and 169 patients (69.0%) with demoralization did not satisfy the criteria for major depression. Conclusions: The findings suggest a high prevalence of demoralization in the medically ill and the feasibility of a differentiation between demoralization and depression. Further research may determine whether demoralization, alone or in association with major depression, entails prognostic and clinical implications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)391-394
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume66
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2005

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Research
Endocrinology
Gastroenterology
Cardiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Outpatients
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Mangelli, L., Fava, G. A., Grandi, S., Grassi, L., Ottolini, F., Porcelli, P., ... Sonino, N. (2005). Assessing demoralization and depression in the setting of medical disease. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 66(3), 391-394.

Assessing demoralization and depression in the setting of medical disease. / Mangelli, Lara; Fava, Giovanni A.; Grandi, Silvana; Grassi, Luigi; Ottolini, Fedra; Porcelli, Piero; Rafanelli, Chiara; Rigatelli, Marco; Sonino, Nicoletta.

In: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, Vol. 66, No. 3, 03.2005, p. 391-394.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mangelli, L, Fava, GA, Grandi, S, Grassi, L, Ottolini, F, Porcelli, P, Rafanelli, C, Rigatelli, M & Sonino, N 2005, 'Assessing demoralization and depression in the setting of medical disease', Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, vol. 66, no. 3, pp. 391-394.
Mangelli L, Fava GA, Grandi S, Grassi L, Ottolini F, Porcelli P et al. Assessing demoralization and depression in the setting of medical disease. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 2005 Mar;66(3):391-394.
Mangelli, Lara ; Fava, Giovanni A. ; Grandi, Silvana ; Grassi, Luigi ; Ottolini, Fedra ; Porcelli, Piero ; Rafanelli, Chiara ; Rigatelli, Marco ; Sonino, Nicoletta. / Assessing demoralization and depression in the setting of medical disease. In: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 2005 ; Vol. 66, No. 3. pp. 391-394.
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