Assessing recurrent interactions in cortical networks: Modeling EEG response to transcranial magnetic stimulation

Jui Yang Chang, Matteo Fecchio, Andrea Pigorini, Marcello Massimini, Giulio Tononi, Barry D. Van Veen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The basic mechanisms underlying the electroencephalograpy (EEG) response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the human cortex are not well understood. New method: A state-space modeling methodology is developed to gain insight into the network nature of the TMS/EEG response. Cortical activity is modeled using a multivariariate autoregressive model with exogenous stimulation parameters representing the effect of TMS. An observation equation models EEG measurement of cortical activity. An expectation–maximization algorithm is developed to estimate the model parameters. Results: The methodology is used to assess two different hypotheses for the mechanisms underlying TMS/EEG in wakefulness and sleep. The integrated model hypothesizes that recurrent interactions between cortical regions are the source of TMS/EEG, while the segregated model hypothesizes that the TMS/EEG results from excitation of independent cortical oscillators. The results show that the relatively simple EEG response to TMS recorded during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep is described equally well by either the integrated or segregated model. However, the integrated model fits the more complex TMS/EEG of wakefulness much better than the segregated model. Comparison with existing method(s): Existing methods are limited to small numbers of cortical regions of interest or do not represent the effect of TMS. Our results are consistent with previous studies contrasting the complexity of TMS/EEG in wakefulness and sleep. Conclusion: The new method strongly suggests that effective feedback connections between cortical regions are required to produce the TMS/EEG in wakefulness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-104
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Methods
Volume312
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 15 2019

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Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Wakefulness
Sleep
Eye Movements
Observation

Keywords

  • Electroencephalography
  • Expectation–maximization algorithm
  • Multivariate autoregressive model with exogenous stimulation
  • State-space model
  • Transcranial magnetic stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Assessing recurrent interactions in cortical networks : Modeling EEG response to transcranial magnetic stimulation. / Chang, Jui Yang; Fecchio, Matteo; Pigorini, Andrea; Massimini, Marcello; Tononi, Giulio; Van Veen, Barry D.

In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods, Vol. 312, 15.01.2019, p. 93-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chang, Jui Yang ; Fecchio, Matteo ; Pigorini, Andrea ; Massimini, Marcello ; Tononi, Giulio ; Van Veen, Barry D. / Assessing recurrent interactions in cortical networks : Modeling EEG response to transcranial magnetic stimulation. In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods. 2019 ; Vol. 312. pp. 93-104.
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