Assessing the real benefits of surgery for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis without instability and spondylolisthesis: a single surgeon experience with a mean 8-year follow-up

Riccardo Caruso, Alessandro Pesce, Valentina Martines, Venceslao Wierzbicki, Emanuele Piccione, Sergio Paolini, Tiziana Lanciano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis is one of the most commonly treated spinal disorders in older adults; despite its increasing frequency, it is not yet clear what the most effective therapy might be. The aim of this study is to investigate the very long term results of a homogenized cohort of patients suffering from lumbar spinal stenosis: the first subset of patients operated on with laminectomy and the second subset of patients was also advised to undergo laminectomy but never operated on. Methods: Patients from both subgroups were advised to undergo surgery, according to the same criteria, in the period between 2000 and 2010 and were re-evaluated in the period between January and December 2016. Results: Comparing the two subsets of patients, both suffering from clinically relevant LSS, the first subset returns a statistically significant clinical improvement at follow-up. The rate of excellent results decreases over years. Iatrogenic spinal instability incidence was found to be 3.8% in the present cohort. Conclusions: Although the improvement of the first postoperative years decreases over time and despite the lack of general consensus, the lack of established shared guidelines and the limitations of this research, the results support the utilisation of surgery for the management of this condition. Level of Evidence: 3.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6
JournalJournal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2018

Keywords

  • Iatrogenic instability
  • Laminectomy
  • Lumbar spinal fusion
  • Lumbar spinal stenosis
  • Lumbar spine
  • MRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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