Assessment of baroreflex sensitivity from spontaneous oscillations of blood pressure and heart rate: Proven clinical value?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The baroreceptor-heart rate reflex (baroreflex sensitivity, BRS) is a key mechanisms contributing to the neural regulation of the cardiovascular system. Therefore, the measurement of this reflex is a source of valuable information in the management of a variety of cardiovascular disorders. Several methods have been proposed so far to assess BRS by analyzing the spontaneous beat-to-beat fluctuations of arterial pressure and heart rate. These methods are inherently simple, non-invasive and low-cost. This article briefly reviews most representative clinical studies using these techniques in the attempt to assess their impact in the clinical management of patients with cardiovascular disease. These studies were based on three major algorithms for analyzing spontaneous oscillations of blood pressure and heart rate: the sequence method, the transfer function method and the more recent phase-rectified signal averaging method. We show that these methods have been successfully used both in prognostic evaluation and in the assessment of treatment effect.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2014 8th Conference of the European Study Group on Cardiovascular Oscillations, ESGCO 2014
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages231-232
Number of pages2
ISBN (Print)9781479939695
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Event2014 8th Conference of the European Study Group on Cardiovascular Oscillations, ESGCO 2014 - Trento, Italy
Duration: May 25 2014May 28 2014

Other

Other2014 8th Conference of the European Study Group on Cardiovascular Oscillations, ESGCO 2014
CountryItaly
CityTrento
Period5/25/145/28/14

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

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