Assessment of chest high-field magnetic resonance imaging in children and young adults with noncystic fibrosis chronic lung disease: comparison to high-resolution computed tomography and correlation with pulmonary function.

Silvia Montella, Francesca Santamaria, Marco Salvatore, Claudio Pignata, Marco Maglione, Paola Iacotucci, Carmine Mollica

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed as a radiation-free alternative to high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) for the assessment and follow-up of chest disorders. Thus far, no study has compared the efficacy of high-field MRI and HRCT in children and adults with noncystic fibrosis (CF) chronic lung disease. The aims of our study were: (1) to assess whether chest high-field MRI is as effective as chest HRCT in identifying pulmonary abnormalities; and (2) to investigate the relationships between the severity and extent of lung disease, and functional data in patients with non-CF chronic lung disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-one subjects (median age, 13.8 years; range, 5.9-29.3 years; 30 children/11 adults) with primary ciliary dyskinesia (n = 14), primary immunodeficiency (n = 14), or recurrent pneumonia (n = 13) underwent pulmonary function tests, chest HRCT (120 kV, dose-modulated mAs) and high-field 3.0-T MRI (HASTE; transversal orientation; repetition time/echo time/flip angle/acquisition time, infinite/92 milliseconds/150 degrees/approximately 90 seconds). HRCT and MRI images were scored in consensus by 2 raters using a modified version of the Helbich scoring system. The maximal score was 25. RESULTS: HRCT and high-field MRI total scores were 11 (range: 1-20) and 11 (range: 1-17), respectively. There was good agreement between the 2 techniques for all scores (r > 0.8). HRCT and MRI total scores, and extent of bronchiectasis scores were significantly related to pulmonary function tests (r = -0.4, P <0.05). The MRI mucous plugging score was significantly related to pulmonary function tests (r = -0.4, P <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Chest high-field 3.0-T MRI appears to be as effective as HRCT in assessing the extent and severity of lung abnormalities in non-CF chronic lung diseases, and might be a reliable radiation-free option to HRCT.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)532-538
Number of pages7
JournalInvestigative Radiology
Volume44
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2009

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Lung Diseases
Young Adult
Fibrosis
Chronic Disease
Thorax
Tomography
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Lung
Respiratory Function Tests
Kartagener Syndrome
Radiation
Bronchiectasis
Pneumonia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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Assessment of chest high-field magnetic resonance imaging in children and young adults with noncystic fibrosis chronic lung disease : comparison to high-resolution computed tomography and correlation with pulmonary function. / Montella, Silvia; Santamaria, Francesca; Salvatore, Marco; Pignata, Claudio; Maglione, Marco; Iacotucci, Paola; Mollica, Carmine.

In: Investigative Radiology, Vol. 44, No. 9, 09.2009, p. 532-538.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed as a radiation-free alternative to high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) for the assessment and follow-up of chest disorders. Thus far, no study has compared the efficacy of high-field MRI and HRCT in children and adults with noncystic fibrosis (CF) chronic lung disease. The aims of our study were: (1) to assess whether chest high-field MRI is as effective as chest HRCT in identifying pulmonary abnormalities; and (2) to investigate the relationships between the severity and extent of lung disease, and functional data in patients with non-CF chronic lung disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-one subjects (median age, 13.8 years; range, 5.9-29.3 years; 30 children/11 adults) with primary ciliary dyskinesia (n = 14), primary immunodeficiency (n = 14), or recurrent pneumonia (n = 13) underwent pulmonary function tests, chest HRCT (120 kV, dose-modulated mAs) and high-field 3.0-T MRI (HASTE; transversal orientation; repetition time/echo time/flip angle/acquisition time, infinite/92 milliseconds/150 degrees/approximately 90 seconds). HRCT and MRI images were scored in consensus by 2 raters using a modified version of the Helbich scoring system. The maximal score was 25. RESULTS: HRCT and high-field MRI total scores were 11 (range: 1-20) and 11 (range: 1-17), respectively. There was good agreement between the 2 techniques for all scores (r > 0.8). HRCT and MRI total scores, and extent of bronchiectasis scores were significantly related to pulmonary function tests (r = -0.4, P <0.05). The MRI mucous plugging score was significantly related to pulmonary function tests (r = -0.4, P <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Chest high-field 3.0-T MRI appears to be as effective as HRCT in assessing the extent and severity of lung abnormalities in non-CF chronic lung diseases, and might be a reliable radiation-free option to HRCT.",
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AU - Salvatore, Marco

AU - Pignata, Claudio

AU - Maglione, Marco

AU - Iacotucci, Paola

AU - Mollica, Carmine

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