Association between cannabinoid type-1 receptor polymorphism and body mass index in a southern Italian population

P. Gazzerro, M. G. Caruso, M. Notarnicola, G. Misciagna, V. Guerra, C. Laezza, M. Bifulco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context: Endocannabinoids control food intake via both central and peripheral mechanisms, and cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1) modulates lipogenesis in primary adipocyte cell cultures and in animal models of obesity. Objectives: We aimed to evaluate, at the population level, the frequency of a genetic polymorphism of CB1 and to study its correlation with body mass index. Design, setting and participants: Healthy subjects from a population survey carried out in southern Italy examined in 1992-1993 and older than 65 years (n=419, M=237, F=182) were divided into quintiles by body mass index (BMI). Two hundred and ten subjects were randomly sampled from the first, third and fifth quintile of BMI (BMI, respectively: 16.2-23.8=normal, 26.7-28.4=overweight, 31.6-49.7=obese) to reach a total of 70 per quintile. Their serum and white cells from the biological bank were used to measure the genotype and the blood variables for the study. Measurements: Anthropometric parameters, blood pressure, serum glucose and lipid levels were measured with standard methods; genotyping for the CB1 1359G/A polymorphism was performed using multiplex PCR. Statistical methods included χ 2 for trend, binomial and multinomial multiple logistic regression to model BMI on the genotype, controlling for potential confounders. Results: We found a clear trend of increasing relative frequency of the CB1 wild-type genotype with the increase of BMI (P=0.03) and, using a multiple logistic regression model, wild-type genotype, female gender, age, glycaemia and triglycerides were directly associated with both overweight (third quintile of BMI) and obesity (fifth quintile of BMI). Conclusions: Although performed in a limited number of subjects, our results show that the presence of the CB1 polymorphic allele was significantly associated with a lower BMI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)908-912
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2007

Fingerprint

cannabinoids
Cannabinoid Receptors
body mass index
Body Mass Index
genetic polymorphism
receptors
Population
Genotype
genotype
Logistic Models
blood serum
obesity
Obesity
Cannabinoid Receptor CB1
Endocannabinoids
Lipogenesis
Primary Cell Culture
Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction
lipogenesis
Genetic Polymorphisms

Keywords

  • BMI
  • Cannabinoid type-1 receptor
  • CB1-polymorphism
  • Endocannabinoids
  • Glycaemia
  • Lipid profile

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Endocrinology
  • Food Science
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Association between cannabinoid type-1 receptor polymorphism and body mass index in a southern Italian population. / Gazzerro, P.; Caruso, M. G.; Notarnicola, M.; Misciagna, G.; Guerra, V.; Laezza, C.; Bifulco, M.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 31, No. 6, 06.2007, p. 908-912.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Bifulco, M.

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