Association Between Lifestyle and Systemic Arterial Hypertension in Young Adults: A National, Survey-Based, Cross-Sectional Study

Rosa Maria Bruno, Giacomo Pucci, Martina Rosticci, Laura Guarino, Chiara Guglielmo, Claudia Agabiti Rosei, S. Monticone, Alessandra Giavarini, Chiara Lonati, Camilla Torlasco, Massimiliano Fedecostante, Maria Manzi, Francesca Pezzutto, Marina Di Pilla, Nathan Artom, Allegra Battistoni, Giulia Pignatelli, Viola Sanga, M. Pengo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: The prevalence of systemic arterial hypertension in young adults is increasing worldwide in association with modifiable risk factors. Aim: To assess the prevalence of high blood pressure (BP) in young adults participating to a screening campaign during the World Hypertension Day (17/05/2014), and to determine the possible association with lifestyle factors. Methods: 493 individuals aged 18–35 years were selected in 13 Italian cities. All participants underwent BP measurement together with the administration of a questionnaire exploring: medical and drug history; traditional cardiovascular risk factors and diseases; dietary pattern; salt intake; sleep habits; mood disorders. Results: High BP (≥140/90 mmHg) was found in 54 individuals, with a prevalence of 11 % and awareness of 28 %. Those with high BP values were more frequently men, reported a higher BMI and a greater use of corticosteroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and had a lower anxiety score. Concerning dietary habits, they were more likely to eat cheese/cold cuts ≥3 times/week, to have their meals out ≥1/day and to eat in fast foods ≥1/week. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, male sex [OR 3.19, 95 % CI (1.33–7.63)], BMI [OR 1.14 95 % CI (1.04–1.25)], eating in fast foods [OR 3.10 95 % CI (1.21–7.95)], and anxiety [OR 0.85 95 % CI (0.75–0.97)], were independently associated with high BP. Conclusions: High BP values were found in 11 % young adults. Male sex, adiposity and alimentary habits were the main determinants of high BP values, indicating that young men are a suitable target for healthy lifestyle interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31-40
Number of pages10
JournalHigh Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Prevention
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2016

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Dietary habits
  • Hypertension
  • Lifestyle
  • Young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Internal Medicine

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    Bruno, R. M., Pucci, G., Rosticci, M., Guarino, L., Guglielmo, C., Agabiti Rosei, C., Monticone, S., Giavarini, A., Lonati, C., Torlasco, C., Fedecostante, M., Manzi, M., Pezzutto, F., Di Pilla, M., Artom, N., Battistoni, A., Pignatelli, G., Sanga, V., & Pengo, M. (2016). Association Between Lifestyle and Systemic Arterial Hypertension in Young Adults: A National, Survey-Based, Cross-Sectional Study. High Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Prevention, 23(1), 31-40. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40292-016-0135-6