Association between Sirtuin 1 Gene rs10997870 Polymorphism and Suicide Behaviors in Bipolar Disorder

Alessandra Nivoli, Stefano Porcelli, Diego Albani, Gianluigi Forloni, Federica Fusco, Francesc Colom, Eduard Vieta, Alessandro Serretti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background/Aims: Suicidal behavior (SB) in bipolar disorder (BD) is a complex multifactorial event resulting from an interaction of genetic, neurobiological and psychosocial factors. Recent studies identified new possible mechanisms, suggesting a role for sirtuins (SIRTs 1-7), a family of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent enzymes with a multifaceted role in the central nervous system. The aims of the present study were: (1) to investigate the effects of the rs10997870 SIRT1 gene variant on SB in BD; (2) to explore the effects of the same gene variant on specific depressive symptoms at the severest episode. Methods: One hundred and eighty DSM-IV bipolar outpatients were enrolled in a naturalistic cohort study. The rs10997870 polymorphism within the SIRT1 gene was analyzed. Results: An association between the GG genotype and SB was detected (lifetime: p = 0.015). Compared to other genotypes, GG carriers presented more frequently psychomotor agitation (p = 0.009) and a higher Hamilton Depression Rating Scale total score (p = 0.014) at the severest depressive episode. SB and psychomotor agitation were found to be associated with GG carriers and G allele in a multivariate analysis as well. Conclusion: Our findings suggest a role of the rs10997870 SIRT1 gene variant in SB amongst BD patients and its association with specific depressive symptoms. Despite a number of limitations of this exploratory study, our results may provide new insight into the mechanisms underlying SB in BD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-7
JournalNeuropsychobiology
Volume74
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Keywords

  • Bipolar disorder
  • rs10997870 polymorphism
  • SIRT1 gene variant
  • Suicidal behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Biological Psychiatry

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