Association of sarcopenia and gut microbiota composition in older patients with advanced chronic kidney disease, investigation of the interactions with uremic toxins, inflammation and oxidative stress

Elisabetta Margiotta, Lara Caldiroli, Maria Luisa Callegari, Francesco Miragoli, Francesca Zanoni, Silvia Armelloni, Vittoria Rizzo, Piergiorgio Messa, Simone Vettoretti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Sarcopenia is a prevalent condition in chronic kidney disease (CKD). We deter-mined gut microbiota (gMB) composition in CKD patients with or without sarcopenia. Furthermore, we investigated whether in these patients, there was any association between gMB, uremic toxins, inflammation and oxidative stress. Methods: We analyzed gMB composition, uremic toxins (indoxyl sulphate and p-cresyl sulphate), inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 10, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6, interleukin 17, interleukin 12 p70, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and fetuin-A) and oxidative stress (malondialdehyde) of 64 elderly CKD patients (10 < eGFR < 45 mL/min/1.73 m2, not on dialysis) categorized as sarcopenic and not-sarcopenic. Sarcopenia was defined according to European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People 2 criteria. Results: Sarcopenic patients had a greater abundance of the Micrococcaceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae families and of Megasphaera, Rothia, Veillonella, Akkermansia and Coprobacillus genera. They had a lower abundance of the Gemellaceae and Veillonellaceae families and of Acidaminococcus and Gemella genera. GMB was associated with uremic toxins, inflammatory cytokines and MDA. However, uremic toxins, inflammatory cytokines and MDA were not different in sarcopenic compared with not-sarcopenic individuals, except for interleukin 10, which was higher in not-sarcopenic patients. Conclusions: In older CKD patients, gMB was different in sarcopenic than in not-sarcopenic ones. Several bacterial families and genera were associated with uremic toxins and inflammatory cytokines, although none of these latter substantially different in sarcopenic versus not-sarcopenic patients.

Original languageEnglish
Article number472
JournalToxins
Volume13
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2021

Keywords

  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Gut microbiota
  • Inflammation
  • Oxidative stress
  • Sarcopenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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