Associations of Body Mass Index (BMI) at five years of age with parental characteristics and early dietary habits in a population of healthy children

M. Giovannini, S. Scaglioni, C. Agostoni, S. Decarlis, L. Bernardo, E. Riva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We have assessed early potential predictors of later BMI development in a pediatric population followed up from birth in an ongoing, long-term survey. One-hundred fifty eight subjects, of both sexes, were measured and their dietary habits assessed by means of a food-frequency-questionnaire at 1 and 5 years of age. Parental weight and length were recorded too. The BMI was classified at 5 years according with the NHANES curves: 90th PA (group 3). Parental BMI, total calorie, protein%, carbohydrate% and lipid% intakes at 1 and 5 years were considered. Results are reported as mean±SD. BMI values at 5 years were correlated with those found at 1 year (r=0.46). Group 3 showed higher BMI values in both parents (maternal BMI, 25.0±5.4 vs. 22.9±3.7; paternal BMI, 26.5±3.0 vs 24.4±2.4), a higher protein % (22±5 vs 20±3) and a lower total carbohydrate % (44±8 vs 47±7) intake at 1 year. Subjects born to obese mothers and formula-fed as infants had a relative risk of 2.6 (95% CI = 1.1-5.9) to have a BMI at 5 years > 90th PA versus their breastfed counterparts. Our findings suggest that a link between the parental BMI and early dietary habits may mark the BMI development in early childhood.

Original languageEnglish
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume12
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Mar 20 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

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