Atlas-based vs. individual-based deterministic tractography of corpus callosum in multiple sclerosis

M. Laganà, M. Rovaris, A. Ceccarelli, C. Venturelli, D. Caputo, P. Cecconi, G. Baselli

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Diffusion tensor (DT) magnetic resonance imaging is able to quantify tissue microstructure properties and to detect pathological changes even in the normal appearing tissues. DT sequence parameters which provide optimal SNR and minimum acquisition time, and an individual-based tractography post-processing allowed corpus callosum tractography even in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients also with no need of a-priori atlas. In this preliminary study, we were able to obtain reliable individual-based tractography in 28/30 MS patients. DT-derived indices computed in tracks obtained with individual-based tractography were able to differentiate healthy volunteers from MS patients better than the same indices computed with the atlas method. This indicates that such an optimized sequence may be a reliable tool to be used in future MS studies.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009
Pages2699-2702
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Event31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009 - Minneapolis, MN, United States
Duration: Sep 2 2009Sep 6 2009

Other

Other31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009
CountryUnited States
CityMinneapolis, MN
Period9/2/099/6/09

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Medicine(all)

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