Atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) for the evaluation of metallosis in prostheses and artificial organs: A new approach

G. Pierini, M. Fini, G. Giavaresi, S. Dallari, M. Brayda Bruno, M. Rocca, N. Nicolialdini, R. Giardino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To study the presence of metals in body fluids and tissues after implantation of metallic biomaterials and possible related diseases, a new approach in Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS) was developed. This technique was compared to three traditional methods: mineralisation with acid digestion (method A) also known as 'wet method', dry ashing (with or without oxygen) (method B); classic Kjeldaal (method C). The new approach (method D) modifies the mineralisation phase and the instrument operating instructions. Al, Na, Cr, K, Ni, Co, Ti, Fe, Hg, Pb, V, Sb and Cu levels were tested with the four methods on bone, muscle, cartilage, skin, brain, lymph nodes, blood, urine, and hair. Test results were checked by the addition method. Results demonstrated a significantly higher percentage of Al, Cr, Ni, Ti and Hg recovery with the new approach. The advantages of method D are no residue, no redox reaction, insignificant loss of analytes and enhanced sensitivity (at ppb level vs ppm of the other methods). This approach should be considered especially when testing heavy metals and complex matrices. Its disadvantages are that it is more time consuming and requires the presence of an operator.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)522-527
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Artificial Organs
Volume22
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Artificial Organs
Artificial organs
Atomic Spectrophotometry
Redox reactions
Body fluids
Coordination Complexes
Spectrophotometry
Cartilage
Biocompatible Materials
Heavy Metals
Prosthetics
Biomaterials
Heavy metals
Prostheses and Implants
Muscle
Brain
Skin
Bone
Blood
Metals

Keywords

  • Artificial organs
  • Atomic absorption spectrophotometry
  • Metallosis
  • Prostheses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics

Cite this

Atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) for the evaluation of metallosis in prostheses and artificial organs : A new approach. / Pierini, G.; Fini, M.; Giavaresi, G.; Dallari, S.; Brayda Bruno, M.; Rocca, M.; Nicolialdini, N.; Giardino, R.

In: International Journal of Artificial Organs, Vol. 22, No. 7, 1999, p. 522-527.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Giavaresi, G.

AU - Dallari, S.

AU - Brayda Bruno, M.

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AU - Nicolialdini, N.

AU - Giardino, R.

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