Attention Remediation Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Childhood and Adolescence

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) frequently affects both the basic and the superordinate components of attention; deficits vary according to patient age. This study evaluated the efficacy of a specific remediation intervention for attention. Sixty-five TBI patients (aged 6-18 years) with attention deficit were assessed at baseline and at 1-year follow-up: 40 patients received attention-specific neuropsychological training for 6 months, and the control group comprised 25 patients. Cognitive assessment included a Wechsler Intelligence Scale (e.g., A. Orsini, 1993) and the Continuous Performance Test II (CPT II; C. K. Conners, 2000). The Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS; S. Sparrow, D. Balla & D. V. Cicchetti, 1984) was administered to assess the treatment's ecological validity. At baseline, all patients presented with a mild intellectual disability and pathological scores on the CPT II. At follow-up, significant differences were found between the 2 groups on the CPT II and VABS: The clinical group improved more than the control group. Specific remediation training for attention, including a combination of a process-specific approach and metacognitive strategies, significantly improved attention performance. Improvement in attention skills also affected adaptive skills positively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)40-49
Number of pages10
JournalNeuropsychology
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2009

Keywords

  • attention components
  • cognitive deficit
  • ecological context
  • neuropsychological treatment
  • traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

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