Attributable risk for oral cancer in Northern Italy

Eva Negri, Carlo La Vecchia, Silvia Franceschi, Alessandra Tavani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

115 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using data from a case-control study conducted between 1984 and 1992 in the provinces of Milan and Pordenone, northern Italy, on 439 cases of oral and pharyngeal cancers and 2106 hospital controls, we computed the population attributable risk for oropharyngeal cancer in relation to tobacco, alcohol, and a measure of low β-carotene intake. Two different models were used for estimating relative risks, one assuming that the three factors act multiplicatively on the relative risk and the second estimating separately each combination of alcohol and tobacco and assuming a multiplicative model only for β-carotene. The estimated attributable risks were similar for the two models considered. For both models and both sexes, the single factor with the highest attributable risk was smoking, which accounted for 81-87% of oral cancers in males and for 42-47% in females. Alcohol explained about 60% of male cases, but only 15% of female ones, and low β-carotene accounted for 24% of total cases (25% of males, 17% of females). Together the three factors were responsible for 91-94% of oropharyngeal cancers in males, 51-57% in females, and 85-88% in both sexes combined. The present knowledge of major identified risk factors could, in principle, reduce the burden of the disease in Italy from 2400 to about 200 deaths per year for males and from 500 to 230 for females, thus explaining the difference in incidence and mortality between the two sexes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-193
Number of pages5
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume2
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1993

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Mouth Neoplasms
Italy
Carotenoids
Oropharyngeal Neoplasms
Alcohols
Tobacco
Pharyngeal Neoplasms
Sex Factors
Cancer Care Facilities
Case-Control Studies
Smoking
Mortality
Incidence
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Negri, E., La Vecchia, C., Franceschi, S., & Tavani, A. (1993). Attributable risk for oral cancer in Northern Italy. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 2(3), 189-193.

Attributable risk for oral cancer in Northern Italy. / Negri, Eva; La Vecchia, Carlo; Franceschi, Silvia; Tavani, Alessandra.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 2, No. 3, 1993, p. 189-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Negri, E, La Vecchia, C, Franceschi, S & Tavani, A 1993, 'Attributable risk for oral cancer in Northern Italy', Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 189-193.
Negri E, La Vecchia C, Franceschi S, Tavani A. Attributable risk for oral cancer in Northern Italy. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 1993;2(3):189-193.
Negri, Eva ; La Vecchia, Carlo ; Franceschi, Silvia ; Tavani, Alessandra. / Attributable risk for oral cancer in Northern Italy. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 1993 ; Vol. 2, No. 3. pp. 189-193.
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