Awake mapping optimizes the extent of resection for low-grade gliomas in eloquent areas

Alessandro De Benedictis, Sylvie Moritz-Gasser, Hugues Duffau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

144 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Awake craniotomy with intraoperative electrical mapping is a reliable method to minimize the risk of permanent deficit during surgery for low-grade glioma located within eloquent areas classically considered inoperable. However, it could be argued that preservation of functional sites might lead to a lesser degree of tumor removal. To the best of our knowledge, the extent of resection has never been directly compared between traditional and awake procedures. Objective: We report for the first time a series of patients who underwent 2 consecutive surgeries without and with awake mapping. Methods: Nine patients underwent surgery for a low-grade glioma in functional sites under general anesthesia in other institutions. The resection was subtotal in 3 cases and partial in 6 cases. There was a postoperative worsening in 3 cases. We performed a second surgery in the awake condition with intraoperative electrostimulation. The resection was performed according to functional boundaries at both the cortical and subcortical levels. Results: Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed that the resection was complete in 5 cases and subtotal in 4 cases (no partial removal) and that it was improved in all cases compared with the first surgery (P = .04). There was no permanent neurological worsening. Three patients improved compared with the presurgical status. All patients returned to normal professional and social lives. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that awake surgery, known to preserve the quality of life in patients with low-grade glioma, is also able to significantly improve the extent of resection for lesions located in functional regions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1074-1084
Number of pages11
JournalNeurosurgery
Volume66
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2010

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Glioma
Craniotomy
General Anesthesia
Quality of Life
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Awake surgery
  • Direct electrical stimulation
  • Functional brain mapping
  • Low-grade glioma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Awake mapping optimizes the extent of resection for low-grade gliomas in eloquent areas. / De Benedictis, Alessandro; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Duffau, Hugues.

In: Neurosurgery, Vol. 66, No. 6, 06.2010, p. 1074-1084.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Benedictis, Alessandro ; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie ; Duffau, Hugues. / Awake mapping optimizes the extent of resection for low-grade gliomas in eloquent areas. In: Neurosurgery. 2010 ; Vol. 66, No. 6. pp. 1074-1084.
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