B cell activation and human immunodeficiency virus infection. V. Phenotypic and functional alterations in CD5+ and CD5- B cell subsets

Stefano Indraccolo, Marta Mion, Rita Zamarchi, Arianna Veronesi, Maria Luisa Veronese, Marina Panozzo, Corrado Betterle, Andrea Barelli, Alfredo Borri, Alberto Amadori, Luigi Chieco-Bianchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

B cell dysregulation is a hallmark of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Since B lymphocytes comprise two distinct subpopulations, CD5+ and CD5- cells, we addressed their individual phenotypic and functional behavior. Seropositive patients with both limited and advanced disease progression had an increased percentage of peripheral blood CD5+ B cells, compared to seronegative controls (20.1±2.1 and 22.7±5.7, respectively, vs 17.0±3.4 in controls); however, due to the lymphopenia and reduced number of circulating B cells in infected individuals, the absolute number of CD19+ CD5+ lymphocytes was actually reduced. Although HIV-specific antibodies were synthesized spontaneously in vitro only by CD5- B cells, a 10-fold lower degree of spontaneous, non-HIV-specific activation was also displayed by unstimulated CD5+ B cells. These findings indicate that B cell dysregulation during HIV infection involves both the CD5- and the CD5+ B cell compartments; moreover, in view of the putative role of CD5+ B cells in autoimmune phenomena and IL-10 production, these data reinforce the possibility that B cell dysfunction might be causally involved in AIDS pathogenesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)381-388
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Immunology
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1993

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • anti-HIV antibody
  • B lymphocytes
  • CD5
  • human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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