Bacterial adhesion to respiratory mucosa and its modulation by antibiotics at sub-inhibitory concentrations

Gioia Piatti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Respiratory infections develop after contact and successive adhesion of micro-organisms to airway mucosa. In fact, the bacterial adhesins are able to interact with a 'lock and key' mechanism with the analogous structures on epithelial surfaces when permissive conditions occur. It was observed that antibiotics at sub-inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) can modify bacterial ability of adhesion to host cells, in various ways. Bacterial adhesion is generally inhibited by antibiotics that, at these concentrations, do not kill bacteria but can change the surface architecture of the micro-organisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)289-299
Number of pages11
JournalPharmacological Research
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Keywords

  • antibiotics
  • respiratory infections
  • subinhibitory concentrations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

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