Barbiturates, alcohols and the CNS excitatory neurotransmission: Specific effects on the kainate and quisqualate receptors

V. I. Teichberg, N. Tal, O. Goldberg, A. Luini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The effects of barbiturates and straight-chain aliphatic alcohols on the responses of rat striatal neurons to excitatory amino acids have been investigated. The responses to N-methyl-D-aspartate, quisqualate, kainate, L-glutamate and L-aspartate were measured by the increase in 22Na+ efflux rate that they produce in brain slices. The responses to quisqualate and kainate, measured in the 22Na+ efflux assay, were found to be partially blocked by barbiturates whereas the responses to N-methyl-D-aspartate, glutamate and aspartate were not. The kainate and quisqualate-induced increases in 22Na+ efflux rate were much more readily blocked by the presence of aliphatic alcohols than were the responses to N-methyl-D-aspartate, glutamate and aspartate. These results strengthen the idea of the existence of 4 distinct receptors for excitatory amino acids in the rat striatum. They are consistent with the presence on the kainate and quisqualate receptors, but not on the N-methyl-D-aspartate and glutamate/aspartate receptors of a hydrophobic domain which would provide a site of interaction for barbiturates and alcohols. They suggest that receptors for excitatory amino acids can be targets for the actions of barbiturates and alcohols on the central nervous system, and may mediate some of the anesthetic and hypnotic effects of these drugs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)285-292
Number of pages8
JournalBrain Research
Volume291
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 23 1984

Keywords

  • alcohols
  • barbiturate
  • brain slices
  • excitatory amino acids
  • receptors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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