Baroreflex activation therapy for the treatment of heart failure

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) results in centrally mediated reduction of sympathetic outflow and increased parasympathetic activity to the heart via a physiological reflex pathway. In a pilot study in 11 NYHA Class III heart failure (HF) patients, BAT produced a persistent significant reduction of sympathetic activity over 21 months follow-up and a dramatic decrease in the number and length of hospitalizations. In a multinational, prospective, randomized, parallel-controlled, clinical trial in 146 NYHA Class III HF patients, BAT produced a significant N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide reduction (p <0.02). This was associated with a trend toward fewer in-hospital days for HF. BAT might become a powerful tool to repair autonomic alterations due to HF at their origin and thus, profoundly affect the prognosis of advanced HF patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)559-569
Number of pages11
JournalInterventional Cardiology
Volume7
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2015

Fingerprint

Baroreflex
Treatment Failure
Heart Failure
Therapeutics
Brain Natriuretic Peptide
Reflex
Hospitalization
Randomized Controlled Trials

Keywords

  • Autonomic nervous system
  • Baroreflex
  • Heart failure
  • Nonpharmacologic therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Baroreflex activation therapy for the treatment of heart failure. / Gronda, Edoardo; Vanoli, Emilio.

In: Interventional Cardiology, Vol. 7, No. 6, 01.12.2015, p. 559-569.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a1a97e9380864f4b85a4d8e5796f5e0f,
title = "Baroreflex activation therapy for the treatment of heart failure",
abstract = "Baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) results in centrally mediated reduction of sympathetic outflow and increased parasympathetic activity to the heart via a physiological reflex pathway. In a pilot study in 11 NYHA Class III heart failure (HF) patients, BAT produced a persistent significant reduction of sympathetic activity over 21 months follow-up and a dramatic decrease in the number and length of hospitalizations. In a multinational, prospective, randomized, parallel-controlled, clinical trial in 146 NYHA Class III HF patients, BAT produced a significant N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide reduction (p <0.02). This was associated with a trend toward fewer in-hospital days for HF. BAT might become a powerful tool to repair autonomic alterations due to HF at their origin and thus, profoundly affect the prognosis of advanced HF patients.",
keywords = "Autonomic nervous system, Baroreflex, Heart failure, Nonpharmacologic therapy",
author = "Edoardo Gronda and Emilio Vanoli",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2217/ica.15.44",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "559--569",
journal = "Interventional Cardiology Review",
issn = "1756-1477",
publisher = "Future Medicine Ltd.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Baroreflex activation therapy for the treatment of heart failure

AU - Gronda, Edoardo

AU - Vanoli, Emilio

PY - 2015/12/1

Y1 - 2015/12/1

N2 - Baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) results in centrally mediated reduction of sympathetic outflow and increased parasympathetic activity to the heart via a physiological reflex pathway. In a pilot study in 11 NYHA Class III heart failure (HF) patients, BAT produced a persistent significant reduction of sympathetic activity over 21 months follow-up and a dramatic decrease in the number and length of hospitalizations. In a multinational, prospective, randomized, parallel-controlled, clinical trial in 146 NYHA Class III HF patients, BAT produced a significant N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide reduction (p <0.02). This was associated with a trend toward fewer in-hospital days for HF. BAT might become a powerful tool to repair autonomic alterations due to HF at their origin and thus, profoundly affect the prognosis of advanced HF patients.

AB - Baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) results in centrally mediated reduction of sympathetic outflow and increased parasympathetic activity to the heart via a physiological reflex pathway. In a pilot study in 11 NYHA Class III heart failure (HF) patients, BAT produced a persistent significant reduction of sympathetic activity over 21 months follow-up and a dramatic decrease in the number and length of hospitalizations. In a multinational, prospective, randomized, parallel-controlled, clinical trial in 146 NYHA Class III HF patients, BAT produced a significant N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide reduction (p <0.02). This was associated with a trend toward fewer in-hospital days for HF. BAT might become a powerful tool to repair autonomic alterations due to HF at their origin and thus, profoundly affect the prognosis of advanced HF patients.

KW - Autonomic nervous system

KW - Baroreflex

KW - Heart failure

KW - Nonpharmacologic therapy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84948148017&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84948148017&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2217/ica.15.44

DO - 10.2217/ica.15.44

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84948148017

VL - 7

SP - 559

EP - 569

JO - Interventional Cardiology Review

JF - Interventional Cardiology Review

SN - 1756-1477

IS - 6

ER -