Baroreflex sensitivity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) has rapidly gained considerable attention as a result of multiple experimental and clinical reports on its prognostic value after a myocardial infarction. This article reviews the several aspects related to the use and significance of BRS. The methodology of baroreflex testing in man is described. The complex pathophysiology underlying BRS and the hypotheses proposed to explain its frequent reduction after a myocardial infarction are discussed. The section on experimental data also provides a rationale to understand the relation between increased vagal activity and reduced propensity for ventricular fibrillation. The article focuses largely on the clinical studies relating BRS and risk of cardiac mortality and also discusses the several attempts to modify this marker of reflex vagal activation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)761-774
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology
Volume6
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Baroreflex
Myocardial Infarction
Ventricular Fibrillation
Reflex
Mortality

Keywords

  • myocardial infarction
  • ventricular fibrillation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Baroreflex sensitivity. / La Rovere, M. T.; Mortara, A.; Schwartz, P. J.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology, Vol. 6, No. 9, 1995, p. 761-774.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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