Baroreflex sensitivity and its response to deep breathing predict increase in blood pressure in type 1 diabetes in a 5-year follow-up

Milla Rosengård-Bärlund, Luciano Bernardi, Anna Sandelin, Carol Forsblom, Per Henrik Groop

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - We have recently demonstrated that early autonomic dysfunction, defined as low baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), could be functional and reversible. However, potential temporal changes in BRS have not yet been addressed by longitudinal studies in type 1 diabetes. Moreover, it is not known whether low BRS predisposes to hypertension or other nonfatal diabetes complications. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We conducted a 5-year prospective study including 80 patients with type 1 diabetes. We measured ambulatory blood pressure and autonomic function tests. BRS was assessed by six different methods during spontaneous, controlled, and slow deep breathing at baseline and follow-up. RESULTS - Spontaneous BRS declined over time (BRS average 16.2±0.8 vs. 13.2±0.8ms/mmHg; Paverage r =-0.37; P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2424-2430
Number of pages7
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume34
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine
  • Advanced and Specialised Nursing

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Baroreflex sensitivity and its response to deep breathing predict increase in blood pressure in type 1 diabetes in a 5-year follow-up'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this