Beef allergy in children

A. Fiocchi, P. Restani, E. Riva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Beef allergy was poorly known before the '90s. Since then, a number of papers appeared elucidating the nature, epidemiology, and symptoms of beef allergy in children allergic to cow's milk and children suffering from atopic dermatitis. It is now clear that beef allergy is not an infrequent occurrence, with an incidence between 3.28% and 6.52% among children with atopic dermatitis, its incidence may be as much as 0.3% in the general population. A diagnosis of beef allergy must be supported by skin prick tests, RASTs, and challenges. The specificity and sensitivity according to type of test and the type of extract, however, remains to be evaluated. Despite the fact that other allergens can be sensitizing, the major beef allergen is bovine serum albumin (BSA). Beef-sensitive children are also sensitized to ovine serum albumin, as well as to other serum albumins; therefore, the use of alternative meats in beef-allergic children must be carefully evaluated on an individual basis. Because industrial heat processing is more efficient than domestic cooking in reducing reactivity in beef-sensitive children, freeze-drying and homogenization may support the introduction of processed beef into the diet of beef-allergic children. (C) Elsevier Science Inc. 2000.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)454-457
Number of pages4
JournalNutrition
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2000

Fingerprint

Hypersensitivity
Atopic Dermatitis
Serum Albumin
Allergens
Red Meat
Freeze Drying
Incidence
Cooking
Bovine Serum Albumin
Skin Tests
Meat
Sheep
Milk
Epidemiology
Hot Temperature
Diet
Sensitivity and Specificity
Population

Keywords

  • Beef allergy
  • Bovine serum albumin
  • Meat allergy
  • Serum albumins
  • Skin-prick tests

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Surgery

Cite this

Beef allergy in children. / Fiocchi, A.; Restani, P.; Riva, E.

In: Nutrition, Vol. 16, No. 6, 06.2000, p. 454-457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fiocchi, A, Restani, P & Riva, E 2000, 'Beef allergy in children', Nutrition, vol. 16, no. 6, pp. 454-457. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0899-9007(00)00285-9
Fiocchi, A. ; Restani, P. ; Riva, E. / Beef allergy in children. In: Nutrition. 2000 ; Vol. 16, No. 6. pp. 454-457.
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