Behavioral and neurophysiological effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the minimally conscious state: A case study

Francesco Piccione, Marianna Cavinato, Paolo Manganotti, Emanuela Formaggio, Silvia Francesca Storti, Leontino Battistin, Annachiara Cagnin, Paolo Tonin, Mauro Dam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. In 2007, Schiff et al reported a patient in a minimally conscious state (MCS) who responded to deep brain stimulation (DBS), but clinicians cannot predict which patients might respond prior to the implantation of electrodes. Methods. A patient in a MCS for 5 years participated in an ABA design alternating between repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and peripheral nerve stimulation. rTMS (condition A) involved the delivery of 10 trains of 100 stimuli at 20 Hz using a stimulator with a 70-mm figure-of-eight coil to elicit a contraction of the abductor pollicis brevis. Condition B used median nerve electrical stimulation. Results. After peripheral stimulation, the patient did not exhibit clinical, behavioral, or electroencephalographic (EEG) changes. The frequency of specific and meaningful behaviors increased after rTMS, along with the absolute and relative power of the EEG δ, β, and α bands. Conclusion. These results suggest that rTMS may improve awareness and arousal in MCS. If these results are reproducible, rTMS may identify subgroups of MCS patients who might benefit from DBS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)98-102
Number of pages5
JournalNeurorehabilitation and Neural Repair
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

Fingerprint

Persistent Vegetative State
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Deep Brain Stimulation
Median Nerve
Arousal
Peripheral Nerves
Electric Stimulation
Electrodes

Keywords

  • Arousal
  • DBS
  • Minimally conscious state
  • rTMS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Rehabilitation
  • Neurology

Cite this

Behavioral and neurophysiological effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the minimally conscious state : A case study. / Piccione, Francesco; Cavinato, Marianna; Manganotti, Paolo; Formaggio, Emanuela; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Battistin, Leontino; Cagnin, Annachiara; Tonin, Paolo; Dam, Mauro.

In: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 98-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Piccione, Francesco ; Cavinato, Marianna ; Manganotti, Paolo ; Formaggio, Emanuela ; Storti, Silvia Francesca ; Battistin, Leontino ; Cagnin, Annachiara ; Tonin, Paolo ; Dam, Mauro. / Behavioral and neurophysiological effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the minimally conscious state : A case study. In: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair. 2011 ; Vol. 25, No. 1. pp. 98-102.
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