Bench-to-bedside review: Potential strategies to protect or reverse mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis-induced organ failure

Alessandro Protti, Mervyn Singer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The pathogenesis of sepsis-induced multiple organ failure may crucially depend on the development of mitochondrial dysfunction and consequent cellular energetic failure. According to this hypothesis, interventions aimed at preventing or reversing mitochondrial damage may have major clinical relevance, although the timing of such interventions will be critical to both ensuring benefit and avoiding harm. Early correction of tissue hypoxia, strict control of glycaemia, and modulation of oxidative and nitrosative stress may afford protection during the initial, acute systemic inflammatory response. The regulated induction of a hypometabolic state resembling hibernation may protect the cells from dying once energy failure has developed, allowing the possibility of functional recovery. Repair of damaged organelles through stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and reactivation of cellular metabolism may accelerate resolution of the multiple organ failure syndrome.

Original languageEnglish
Article number228
JournalCritical Care
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

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