Benign convulsions in children with mild gastroenteritis

Luca Castellazzi, Nicola Principi, Carlo Agostoni, Susanna Esposito

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Benign convulsions with mild gastroenteritis (CwG) is a clinical condition characterized by convulsions occurring in otherwise healthy children, usually in the absence of fever and in the presence of mild acute gastroenteritis. Until now, CwG had not been fully recognized as an epileptic syndrome, and several aspects of this condition are not clearly defined, especially its pathogenesis. Methods The main aim of this paper is to discuss after the review of the literature what is known about CwG to facilitate its recognition and treatment. Results CwG is a benign condition that has several clinical and prognostic similarities with febrile seizures. The disease occurs in infants and in children who are 1 month to 3 years old, during the winter and early spring when rotavirus and norovirus are circulating. In most cases, seizures follow gastrointestinal symptoms. In a minority of patients, the seizures and gastrointestinal symptoms occur before or simultaneously with the development of diarrhoea. Even if convulsions are mostly described as generalized tonic-clonic, the ictal recordings have always demonstrated a focal origin. Electroencephalography, lumbar punctures, and radiological examinations are not useful because they are normal in these patients; and when alterations are present, they disappear in a relatively short time. Only prolonged seizures, which are usually not common, require antiepileptic treatments in the acute phase. Conclusion Knowledge of CwG characteristics is essential for paediatricians to avoid useless hospitalization, examinations and, above all, drug administration, as the drugs have potential side effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)690-695
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Paediatric Neurology
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2016

Fingerprint

Gastroenteritis
Seizures
Norovirus
Febrile Seizures
Spinal Puncture
Rotavirus
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Anticonvulsants
Electroencephalography
Diarrhea
Hospitalization
Fever
Stroke

Keywords

  • Convulsion
  • Diarrhoea
  • Gastroenteritis
  • Norovirus
  • Rotavirus
  • Seizure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Benign convulsions in children with mild gastroenteritis. / Castellazzi, Luca; Principi, Nicola; Agostoni, Carlo; Esposito, Susanna.

In: European Journal of Paediatric Neurology, Vol. 20, No. 5, 01.09.2016, p. 690-695.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Castellazzi, Luca ; Principi, Nicola ; Agostoni, Carlo ; Esposito, Susanna. / Benign convulsions in children with mild gastroenteritis. In: European Journal of Paediatric Neurology. 2016 ; Vol. 20, No. 5. pp. 690-695.
@article{ed3527890f7c49e99a1e3d8e0852a260,
title = "Benign convulsions in children with mild gastroenteritis",
abstract = "Background Benign convulsions with mild gastroenteritis (CwG) is a clinical condition characterized by convulsions occurring in otherwise healthy children, usually in the absence of fever and in the presence of mild acute gastroenteritis. Until now, CwG had not been fully recognized as an epileptic syndrome, and several aspects of this condition are not clearly defined, especially its pathogenesis. Methods The main aim of this paper is to discuss after the review of the literature what is known about CwG to facilitate its recognition and treatment. Results CwG is a benign condition that has several clinical and prognostic similarities with febrile seizures. The disease occurs in infants and in children who are 1 month to 3 years old, during the winter and early spring when rotavirus and norovirus are circulating. In most cases, seizures follow gastrointestinal symptoms. In a minority of patients, the seizures and gastrointestinal symptoms occur before or simultaneously with the development of diarrhoea. Even if convulsions are mostly described as generalized tonic-clonic, the ictal recordings have always demonstrated a focal origin. Electroencephalography, lumbar punctures, and radiological examinations are not useful because they are normal in these patients; and when alterations are present, they disappear in a relatively short time. Only prolonged seizures, which are usually not common, require antiepileptic treatments in the acute phase. Conclusion Knowledge of CwG characteristics is essential for paediatricians to avoid useless hospitalization, examinations and, above all, drug administration, as the drugs have potential side effects.",
keywords = "Convulsion, Diarrhoea, Gastroenteritis, Norovirus, Rotavirus, Seizure",
author = "Luca Castellazzi and Nicola Principi and Carlo Agostoni and Susanna Esposito",
year = "2016",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ejpn.2016.05.014",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "690--695",
journal = "European Journal of Paediatric Neurology",
issn = "1090-3798",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Benign convulsions in children with mild gastroenteritis

AU - Castellazzi, Luca

AU - Principi, Nicola

AU - Agostoni, Carlo

AU - Esposito, Susanna

PY - 2016/9/1

Y1 - 2016/9/1

N2 - Background Benign convulsions with mild gastroenteritis (CwG) is a clinical condition characterized by convulsions occurring in otherwise healthy children, usually in the absence of fever and in the presence of mild acute gastroenteritis. Until now, CwG had not been fully recognized as an epileptic syndrome, and several aspects of this condition are not clearly defined, especially its pathogenesis. Methods The main aim of this paper is to discuss after the review of the literature what is known about CwG to facilitate its recognition and treatment. Results CwG is a benign condition that has several clinical and prognostic similarities with febrile seizures. The disease occurs in infants and in children who are 1 month to 3 years old, during the winter and early spring when rotavirus and norovirus are circulating. In most cases, seizures follow gastrointestinal symptoms. In a minority of patients, the seizures and gastrointestinal symptoms occur before or simultaneously with the development of diarrhoea. Even if convulsions are mostly described as generalized tonic-clonic, the ictal recordings have always demonstrated a focal origin. Electroencephalography, lumbar punctures, and radiological examinations are not useful because they are normal in these patients; and when alterations are present, they disappear in a relatively short time. Only prolonged seizures, which are usually not common, require antiepileptic treatments in the acute phase. Conclusion Knowledge of CwG characteristics is essential for paediatricians to avoid useless hospitalization, examinations and, above all, drug administration, as the drugs have potential side effects.

AB - Background Benign convulsions with mild gastroenteritis (CwG) is a clinical condition characterized by convulsions occurring in otherwise healthy children, usually in the absence of fever and in the presence of mild acute gastroenteritis. Until now, CwG had not been fully recognized as an epileptic syndrome, and several aspects of this condition are not clearly defined, especially its pathogenesis. Methods The main aim of this paper is to discuss after the review of the literature what is known about CwG to facilitate its recognition and treatment. Results CwG is a benign condition that has several clinical and prognostic similarities with febrile seizures. The disease occurs in infants and in children who are 1 month to 3 years old, during the winter and early spring when rotavirus and norovirus are circulating. In most cases, seizures follow gastrointestinal symptoms. In a minority of patients, the seizures and gastrointestinal symptoms occur before or simultaneously with the development of diarrhoea. Even if convulsions are mostly described as generalized tonic-clonic, the ictal recordings have always demonstrated a focal origin. Electroencephalography, lumbar punctures, and radiological examinations are not useful because they are normal in these patients; and when alterations are present, they disappear in a relatively short time. Only prolonged seizures, which are usually not common, require antiepileptic treatments in the acute phase. Conclusion Knowledge of CwG characteristics is essential for paediatricians to avoid useless hospitalization, examinations and, above all, drug administration, as the drugs have potential side effects.

KW - Convulsion

KW - Diarrhoea

KW - Gastroenteritis

KW - Norovirus

KW - Rotavirus

KW - Seizure

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84991270423&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84991270423&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ejpn.2016.05.014

DO - 10.1016/j.ejpn.2016.05.014

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:84991270423

VL - 20

SP - 690

EP - 695

JO - European Journal of Paediatric Neurology

JF - European Journal of Paediatric Neurology

SN - 1090-3798

IS - 5

ER -