Benign versus secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis: The potential role of proton MR spectroscopy in defining the nature of disability

A. Falini, G. Calabrese, M. Filippi, D. Origgi, S. Lipari, B. Colombo, G. Comi, G. Scotti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

PURPOSE: We determined the clinical utility of proton MR spectroscopy in defining the extent of disability in benign versus secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: Thirty patients with clinically definite MS, including 16 patients with benign MS and 14 with secondary-progressive MS, and a group of 13 healthy volunteers were studied with combined stimulated-echo acquisition mode proton MR spectroscopy and MR imaging (all patients received contrast material). RESULTS: Acute enhancing lesions of benign and secondary-progressive MS were characterized by a reduction in N- acetylaspartate (NAA)/choline and NAA/creatine and an increase in inositol compounds/creatine as compared with normal white matter. Such variations were also detected in chronic unenhancing lesions in patients with secondary- progressive MS, although they were not found in chronic unenhancing lesions in patients with benign MS. Chronic lesions of the two forms of the disease have significative differences in NAA and inositol signals. CONCLUSION: Proton MR spectroscopy is able to show metabolic changes occurring in the white matter of patients with MS. Such changes differ according to the phase (acute versus chronic) and the clinical form (benign versus secondary- progressive) of the disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)223-229
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume19
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

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