Beyond gout: Uric acid and cardiovascular diseases

E. Agabiti-Rosei, G. Grassi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: This article discusses the results of clinical and experimental studies that examine the association of hyperuricemia and gout with cardiovascular (CV) disease. Methods: Key papers for inclusion were identified by a PubMed search, and articles were selected for their relevance to the topic, according to the authors' judgment. Results and conclusions: Significant progress has been made in confirming an association, possibly causal, between hyperuricemia and CV outcomes. Xantine-oxidase (XO) inhibitors appear to be the most promising agents for prevention and treatment of CV consequences associated with hyperuricemia. Several small and medium sized studies have examined the effect of these agents on CV function in a variety of patient populations. Improvements in measures of endothelial function, oxidative stress, cardiac function, hemodynamics, and certain inflammatory indices have been demonstrated. Compounds for XO inhibition with more specific clinical effects and fewer side effects than allopurinol may be promising options to further explore the therapeutic potential in patients with CV disease. It is too early to make clinical recommendations with regard to the benefits of using XO inhibitor allopurinol or the novel febuxostat in patients with asymptomatic increased UA levels and high CV risk because only a small number of studies have shown that they may be beneficial in terms of CV outcomes. More studies are therefore needed to determine the potential of these drugs for reducing the risk of developing CV disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-39
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Medical Research and Opinion
Volume29
Issue numberSUPPL.3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Gout
  • Hyperuricemia
  • Xanthine oxidase inhibitor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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