Biexponential and diffusional kurtosis imaging, and generalised diffusion-tensor imaging (GDTI) with rank-4 tensors

A study in a group of healthy subjects

Ludovico Minati, Domenico Aquino, Stefano Rampoldi, Sergio Papa, Marina Grisoli, Maria Grazia Bruzzone, Elio Maccagnano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Object: Clinical diffusion imaging is based on two assumptions of limited validity: that the radial projections of the diffusion propagator are Gaussian, and that a single directional diffusivity maximum exists in each voxel. The former can be removed using the biexponential and diffusional kurtosis models, the latter using generalised diffusion-tensor imaging. This study provides normative data for these three models. Materials and methods: Eighteen healthy subjects were imaged. Maps of the biexponential parameters D fast, D slow and f slow, of D and K from the diffusional kurtosis model, and of diffusivity D′ were obtained. Maps of generalised anisotropy (GA) and scaled entropy(SE) were also generated, for second and fourth rank tensors. Normative values were obtained for 26 regions. Results: In grey versus white matter, D slow and D′ were higher and D fast, f slow and K were lower. With respect to maps of D′, anatomical contrast was stronger in maps of D slow and K. Elevating tensor rank increased SE, generally more significantly than GA, in: anterior limb of internal capsule, corpus callosum, deep frontal and subcortical white matter, along superior longitudinal fasciculus and cingulum. Conclusion: The values reported herein can be used for reference in future studies and in clinical settings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)241-253
Number of pages13
JournalMagnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology, and Medicine
Volume20
Issue number5-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2007

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Diffusion Tensor Imaging
Anisotropy
Entropy
Healthy Volunteers
Internal Capsule
Potassium Chloride
Corpus Callosum
Extremities
White Matter
Clinical Studies

Keywords

  • Biexponential model
  • Diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI)
  • Diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI)
  • Generalised DTI (GDTI)
  • High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Genetics

Cite this

Biexponential and diffusional kurtosis imaging, and generalised diffusion-tensor imaging (GDTI) with rank-4 tensors : A study in a group of healthy subjects. / Minati, Ludovico; Aquino, Domenico; Rampoldi, Stefano; Papa, Sergio; Grisoli, Marina; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Maccagnano, Elio.

In: Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology, and Medicine, Vol. 20, No. 5-6, 12.2007, p. 241-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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